Affect vs. Effect

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zaed_salah

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Re: effect vs affect ?

Hi

there is another meaning for affect,it means to pretend or to feel something.
And about the examples made by Casiopea:

I think they could be like this:
To affect people; to have an influence on them not to change them.
To effect rain ; to make it raining ( to make something happen not to create it)
 

mykwyner

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Re: effect vs affect ?

Here's how my father taught me this lesson forty years ago:

"A few drinks will affect his recovery." It will change the natural course of his recovery, for either the better or the worse.

" A few drinks will effect his recovery." It will cause him to recover.
 

zaed_salah

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Re: effect vs affect ?

In my opinion , the second sentence would be:

A few drinks will effect recovery " for him" ( means a few drinks will make recovery happen ).
So, the pharse will be wrong because drinks will make the situation worsen .
As I understand, the meaning of 'effect' as verb is to make something happen, and I think it's not appropriate to use it in this case after all.
 

mykwyner

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Re: effect vs affect ?

Well, Zaed, if you've ever had a hangover, you would know that a few drinks (also known as a hair of the dog that bit you) certainly would effect your recovery.
 

bianca

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Re: effect vs affect ?

I understand you, Salah. I am also confused by the 'recovery' thing.

Mykwyner: You effect a recovery with a few drinks, means that the drinks are effective for your recovery, right? The question is: recovery from what? As far as I know, drinking only makes things worse.

Could these examples help?

* Effect as a verb means "to bring about" or "to effect a change."

El Nino is effected by (caused by) global warming.

* When you affect something, you have an effect on it.

Air pollution affects (has an effect on) the global climate. It is a pretty effective (not affective) means of damaging our environment.
 
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using66

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Re: effect vs affect ?

As a verb, what is the difference between "effect" and "affect"?
Hi guys !
i am also confused about some word of English like MAN and MEN
and also there are many word like it .
 

zaed_salah

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Re: effect vs affect ?

Man and men are different; man is single. men is plural form for man, they are completely different from affect and effect.
 

centrc

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These words are really confusing. I want to share an article with you guys that my wife wrote sums this stuff up pretty well. (The Affect of an Effect…or Something Like That | (un)Enlightened English

(Personal site -- no advertisements)

It is true that affect is generally used as a verb and effect as as noun however there are ways that affect can be a noun and effect as a verb although rare.

I think out of all the words in the English language, these are close to the top of confusing ones :)
 

pnker67

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Re: effect vs affect ?

As a verb, what is the difference between "effect" and "affect"?
As a verb affect means “to act on” or “to move” (Her generosity affected those at the hurricane shelter so potently that many shed tears)

As a verb effect means “to bring about, accomplish” (His department effected drastic improvements.)

Note: "Effect" is primarily used as a noun; "Affect" as a verb. Both technically have dual noun/verb usage possibilities.
 
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soutter

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Generally, affect as a verb means to influence; effect however is usually the noun resulting from this influence.

Incorrect: Farmers wonder how the drought will effect this year’s crops.

Correct: Farmers wonder how the drought will affect this year’s crops.

Correct: Farmers wonder what effect the drought will have on this year’s crops.

Effect can also be a verb meaning to bring about. Affect can also be a noun, but it is used strictly in psychological contexts.

An affect or affectation is usually an assumed or false mannerism (think of some poseur lovey-dovey crops walking up and down quoting Proust to each other); but an effect (effectation doesn't exist) is a real and tangible result (think of crops sweating and rotting in the heat).

I think this gives a good distinction between these two words that are very much a stylistic bugbear.
 

nitikasnv

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Affect vs effect

Hi,

Affect: Have an effect upon.
ex:Will the new rules affect me

Effect:A phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon
ex:the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"

Thanks
 

Nightmare85

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I believe I have no problems with "affect" and "effect".
(Hopefully this does not sound arrogant :))
In order to be sure, I want to ask if this is correct:
Are you saying that a hot chick has no effect on you at all?
I say effect because it's a noun.
Affect would be right if the sentence was:
Are you saying that a hot chick does not affect you at all?

A confirmation would be very nice!

Cheers!
 

RonBee

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I believe I have no problems with "affect" and "effect".
(Hopefully this does not sound arrogant :))
In order to be sure, I want to ask if this is correct:
Are you saying that a hot chick has no effect on you at all?
I say effect because it's a noun.
Affect would be right if the sentence was:
Are you saying that a hot chick does not affect you at all?

A confirmation would be very nice!

Cheers!
That is exactly right.
:-D:up:
 
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