Although & Despite

____ feeling sick, she continued working.


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Tdol

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blacknomi

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My vote goes for Despite.


'Although' acts as a connective, and it introduced adverbial clause instead of a gerund. Do I make sense? :)
 

Tdol

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It works. Just about. ;-)
 

Tdol

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Correct- 'despite' can go with a gerund.;-)
 

bradaman

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blacknomi said:
How about this?
I'm new here, it's my first attempt...
I thought that only some linkers (because, after/before, if and when/while)could be turned into participle clauses.
 

Fazzu

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tdol said:
Correct- 'despite' can go with a gerund.;-)

So, 'although' would not go with gerund?
 

Tdol

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Although could go with a gerund if it were part of a complete clause:
Although going to the cinema seemed a nice idea, we decided to stay at home.
Although goes with clauses or adjectives, but doesn't fit into thie example in the poll.
 

tomboy186

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I choose Despite. I think Inspite in this case also works as the structure is" despite/ in spite of + N/Ving, Clause".
 

csharp

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I think "although" will follow by a clause, and "despite" = "in spite of" + nouns.
So in this poll, I use "despite"
 

hamoodee

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despite and although: similar meanings, but different syntax required .
dsespite (inspite of) + noun
Despite feelin sick ..
although (though ) + clause
Although she was feeling sick ..

Learning English | BBC World Service
 
Last edited:

blouen

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Tdol taught me about this a time ago...
It should be despite...:up:
 

belly_ttt

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expecting the news is an complete clause?
Meanwhile, in Tdol's example, feeling tired is not a complete clause either.

How about this?
Pick the correct answer:
a) although raining, he came
b)although it rained, he came

What's the best one?
 

mykeys

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expecting the news is an complete clause?
Meanwhile, in Tdol's example, feeling tired is not a complete clause either.

How about this?
Pick the correct answer:
a) although raining, he came
b)although it rained, he came

What's the best one?

Hi belly_ttt

I think that the correct is" althought it rained, he came"
 

Teia

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although : conjunction
although +clause
Although the storm ended, the sky still looked grey and dark.

despite - preposition
despite + noun
Despite the stormy weather, I went out.
despite + gerund
Despite being ill, he managed to go to work yesterday.

Despite is the correct answer.
 

Teia

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despite is always folloed by the ing form!!!

Despite can be followed by a noun, as well.[not only by a gerund].
Despite the bad weather, he went swimming.
 
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