Always crowded but little to no wait.

kadioguy

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Great shaved ice dessert shop. Popular with locals. Select from preset toppings or you-pick style (so you can get as exotic as you want). Always crowded but little to no wait.
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Why not 'Always crowded but little to wait'?

What do you think?
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Tarheel

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I think the original is fine. Your suggested replacement is not an English phrase.
 

kadioguy

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I think the original is fine. Your suggested replacement is not an English phrase.
I think 'Always crowded but little to no wait' means 'Always crowded but hardly need to wait', so I said 'Why not 'Always crowded but little to wait'.

What do you think?
 

Raymott

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The original "little to no wait" means that there is a spectrum of waiting times, but that spectrum goes from a little wait to no wait (that is, if you have to wait at all, it won't be for long.)
 

GoesStation

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I said 'Why not 'Always crowded but little to wait'.

What do you think?
It's not meaningful in English.

Little to no wait means your wait time will range from a little to none at all.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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There's from little wait to no wait.

This kind of phrase is common in English:

- from here to there
- from rags to riches
- from soup to nuts (meaning from the first course of the meal to the last)
- from sunrise to sunset
- from coast to coast (meaning from the east coast of the US to the west coast)
- from head to toe

So is there a long wait? No. There's from little to none.
 
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