An event like that won't happen for many years to come

JACEK1

Key Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2013
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Polish
Home Country
Poland
Current Location
Poland
Hello.

A few days ago, powerful wind struck a portion of Poland, among others, a stretch of forest where children were spending their holidays. As a result of the wind, at least 5 chiildren got killed. The persons, who commented on this terrible incident, said that there would be a long time before a similar event took place again.

How could I epress it properly?

An event like that won't happen for many years to come.

or

Such an event will be very slow/long in coming.

By an even like that or such an event, I mean the fact that children usually go camping in a forest or somewhere else during summer (holidays) (which was the case in this case).

What is your opinion?

Tank you.
 
Last edited:

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Hello.

A few days ago, ​a powerful wind struck [STRIKE]a portion[/STRIKE] an area/a region of Poland, among [STRIKE]others[/STRIKE] other places/countries, in a [STRIKE]stretch of[/STRIKE] forest where children were spending their holidays. As a result of the wind, at least 5 [STRIKE]chiildren[/STRIKE] children got killed ("were killed" is more natural). The [STRIKE]persons,[/STRIKE] people who commented on this terrible incident (no comma here) said that [STRIKE]there[/STRIKE] it would be a long time before a similar event took place again.

How [STRIKE]could[/STRIKE] can/should I express it properly?

An event like that won't happen for many years to come. :tick:

or

Such an event will be very slow/long in coming. :tick:

By "an event like that" or "such an event", I mean the fact that children usually go camping in a forest or somewhere else during summer (holidays) (which was the case in this case).
No. "An event like that" and "such an event" refer to the powerful wind.

What is your opinion?

Thank you.

See above.
 

cereal_chick

Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2011
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Hello.

A few days ago, a powerful wind struck a portion of Poland, [STRIKE]among others, [/STRIKE] (this doesn't sound very natural, and doesn't really make grammatical sense either) including a stretch of forest where some (better to specific children, otherwise you sound sort of like you are talking about children in general, which is weird) children were spending their holidays. As a result of the wind, at least 5 children (typo) got killed. [STRIKE]The persons, who commented on this terrible incident,[/STRIKE] (You can, under certain circumstances, use "persons" as the plural of "person", but I don't think this is one of them. Also, using the commas means that the clause "who commented on this terrible incident" is non-restrictive: essentially a "by the way", whereas the fact that they commented defines who they are in this discussion and therefore should be restrictive. Basically, no commas.) The people who commented on this incident (also, it sounds a little unnatural to refer to them as "people". "Those" who commented? But who is commenting? I would recommend being more descriptive about who is commenting.) said that [STRIKE]there[/STRIKE] it would be a long time before a similar event took place again.

How could I express (typo) it properly?

An event like that won't happen for many years to come.

or

Such an event will be very slow/long in coming.

By an event (typo) like that or such an event, I mean the fact that children usually go camping in a forest or somewhere else during summer (holidays) (which was the case [STRIKE]in this case[/STRIKE] [It's clunky to have two "cases" next to each other. You can get rid of it, or say something like "here".]). (I imagine it would be considered bad style to put two pairs of brackets next to each other, but to me it just looks eccentric, which is OK.)

What is your opinion?

Thank (typo) you.

I think the first thing to note is that until you said what the "event" you were referring to was, I believed it was the powerful wind. It does not make sense to refer to the holidaying of the children as "an event", or even "the event". People going on holiday to a certain place just isn't "an/the event" and damned if I know why; maybe an actual teacher can shed some light (maybe one already has, considering how long I've been writing this for). You have to say something else entire, like "they [the children] will not be coming back here for some time".

[Not a teacher]
 

SoothingDave

VIP Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I think he meant the "weather event," which is a common enough phrase, if perhaps a bit jargony.
 
Top