an imp and an old imp

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NewHope

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A child who is playful and mischievous is called an imp or an urchin. And an old man who is still playful and mischievous like an imp should be called an old imp?
 

Tdol

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Why not? In British English we might say an 'old rogue'.;-)
 

NewHope

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But how do you call a man who is really a rogue like that of 'rogue nation North Korea"?
 

Tdol

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'Old rogue' is not as strong in this meaning- the collocation softens it. An 'oldrogue' is generally likeable. ;-)
 

NewHope

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Hehe,very interesting.
 

Tdol

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Francois said:
Yes, 'old' often softens curse words. 'Bitch' is a notable exception ;)

FRC

'Old fart' is another. ;-)
 

Tanja

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By the way, I'll stick my question to this topic :D :

What epithet (or how it is called) do native English speakers use more frequently: Old Nick or Old Harry?

And what those poor guys are guilty for... :lol:
 

Casiopea

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Tanja said:
By the way, I'll stick my question to this topic :D :

What epithet (or how it is called) do native English speakers use more frequently: Old Nick or Old Harry?

And what those poor guys are guilty for... :lol:

I can't say. I've never heard those terms used in North American English. :oops: What about, Tom, Dick, and Harry? As a phrase, it's used to refer to any guy in general, any Tom, any Dick, and any Harry. :wink:
 

Tanja

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Casiopea said:
I can't say. I've never heard those terms used in North American English. :oops: What about, Tom, Dick, and Harry? As a phrase, it's used to refer to any guy in general, any Tom, any Dick, and any Harry. :wink:

I know these buddies - Tom, Dick and Harry - I got acquainted with them while preparing to my lexicology exam :lol: :lol: :lol:

But my dictionary gives: Old Harry=Old Nick=DEVIL :?
 

Casiopea

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Tanja said:
Casiopea said:
I can't say. I've never heard those terms used in North American English. :oops: What about, Tom, Dick, and Harry? As a phrase, it's used to refer to any guy in general, any Tom, any Dick, and any Harry. :wink:

I know these buddies - Tom, Dick and Harry - I got acquainted with them while preparing to my lexicology exam :lol: :lol: :lol:

But my dictionary gives: Old Harry=Old Nick=DEVIL :?

Aha! British English. OK. Tdol should be here soon to shed some light for us. 8)

By the way,

Old Nick (nick vb. 'to steal' (your soul))
Old Harry (harry vb. 'to despoil, ravage')

My dictionary gives Old Nick only. An online search proved the same. :(
 

Tanja

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Casiopea said:
[Old Nick (nick vb. 'to steal' (your soul))
Old Harry (harry vb. 'to despoil, ravage')

That's amazing how absurd and dreadful some names' origins can be... :? :shock:
 

Tdol

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We use 'Old Nick' for the Devil, but I haven't heard 'Old Harry', we also call prison 'the Nick', and when a crook is caught, they are 'nicked'.;-)
 

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Tanja said:
Casiopea said:
[Old Nick (nick vb. 'to steal' (your soul))
Old Harry (harry vb. 'to despoil, ravage')

That's amazing how absurd and dreadful some names' origins can be... :? :shock:

Well, I believe Old Nick and Old Harry are specific. They refer to the devil: The old nicker (the one that steals your soul), and the old harrier ( the one that despoils and ravages). With regards to the well-known names Nick and Harry, they have different etymologies: They do not stem from the verbs 'nick' and 'harry'. :wink:

What does "Tanja" mean? :D
 

Tanja

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:lol: Then an expression: "Oh, Nick, steal my soul..." would be an example of tautology :lol: :lol: :lol:

Unfortunately, the origin of my name is lost somewhere in history.
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, which was from the Roman name Tatius, which is of unknown meaning. Several early saints bore this name.

Maybe in ancient Rome it also meant something dirty :D , though I prefer to believe it didn't :p :D
 

Tanja

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tdol said:
We use 'Old Nick' for the Devil, but I haven't heard 'Old Harry', we also call prison 'the Nick', and when a crook is caught, they are 'nicked'.;-)

I begin to feel confused... Maybe only English-Russian dictionary gives that Old Harry is a devil....but indeed he is a good guy :lol:
 

Casiopea

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Tanja said:
tdol said:
We use 'Old Nick' for the Devil, but I haven't heard 'Old Harry', we also call prison 'the Nick', and when a crook is caught, they are 'nicked'.;-)

I begin to feel confused... Maybe only English-Russian dictionary gives that Old Harry is a devil....but indeed he is a good guy :lol:

Don't feel confused. I saw Old Harry (i.e., the devil) in several online dictionaries. Your dictionary is fabulous!
 

Tanja

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Casiopea said:
Don't feel confused. I saw Old Harry (i.e., the devil) in several online dictionaries. Your dictionary is fabulous!

Yeah... it is so fabulous that it gives the translation of veggies as vegetarians :lol: So, when you wrote to tdol: "Eat more veggies", it smells like cannibalism :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

Casiopea

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Tanja said:
:lol: Then an expression: "Oh, Nick, steal my soul..." would be an example of tautology :lol: :lol: :lol:

Unfortunately, the origin of my name is lost somewhere in history.
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, which was from the Roman name Tatius, which is of unknown meaning. Several early saints bore this name.

Maybe in ancient Rome it also meant something dirty :D , though I prefer to believe it didn't :p :D

Titus Tatius was from the town of Cures in Sabine. In that area, at the time, two main languages were spoken: Latin and Etruscan. In Latin, tata means, daddy (the diminutive for father). Add nominative -ius, and we get Tatius (The Great and Mighty?); In Etruscan, ta- means, this, and tius means, moon: Tatius (This moon?) Anyway, it was an interesting search.

Tatiana daughter of Tatius; Moonchild? Mother of Earth?

Tanja, Moon Goddess. :D
 
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