Ann asked for a few days leave but at the last moment her boss said that she couldn't

tufguy

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1) Ann asked for a few days leave but at the last moment her boss said that she couldn't take those leave. She got into a verbal spat with him because she wanted those leave.

2) Ann asked for a few days off but at the last moment her boss said that she couldn't take those days off. She got into a verbal spat with him because she wanted those days off.

Please check my sentences.
 

GoesStation

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You're repeating nouns again. If Ann asks for something and her request is refused, you can say her boss said she couldn't take them.

Those is the plural of that. You can't say "those leave". But please don't write that leave. Find another way to say it.
 

emsr2d2

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You really must get into the habit of using the word "it".

I did my homework but the dog ate it.
He has a hat and wears it every day.
She asked for some leave but the boss said she couldn't have it.
We have a microwave but we hardly ever use it.

There is no need for the construction you frequently use which would lead to:
I did my homework but the dog ate the/that homework.
He has a hat and wears the/that hat every day.
She asked for some leave but the boss said she couldn't have the/that leave.
We have a microwave but we hardly ever use the/that microwave.
 

tufguy

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1) Ann asked for a few days leave but at the last moment her boss said that she couldn't have it. She got into a verbal spat with him because she wanted it.

2) Ann asked for a few days off but at the last moment her boss said that she couldn't have it. She got into a verbal spat with him because she wanted it.
 
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emsr2d2

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The first sentence in both is now much better.

In the second sentence, I'd use "row", not "verbal spat" and I'd end with "... with him about it". I don't think there's any need to say "because she wanted it". If she hadn't wanted it, she wouldn't have asked for it. If the leave was important, you could end with "because she really needed it".
 

tufguy

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The first sentence in both is now much better.

In the second sentence, I'd use "row", not "verbal spat" and I'd end with "... with him about it". I don't think there's any need to say "because she wanted it". If she hadn't wanted it, she wouldn't have asked for it. If the leave was important, you could end with "because she really needed it".

1) Ann asked for a few days leave but at the last moment her boss said that she couldn't have it. She got into a row with him about it.

2) Ann asked for a few days off but at the last moment her boss said that she couldn't have it. She got into a row with him about it.
 

GoesStation

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They're both okay in British English. (Americans get into fights rather than rows; with that change, it would be fine in American English too.)
 
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