any time vs. anytime

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Jandi

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Joined
Sep 7, 2004
Hello, teachers!
Do these have the same meaning in each sentence?

1. You could have met her [any time, anytime] you liked.
2. Jake is going to be here [any minute, any time, soon].
3. I don't think we can keep it under covers [any longer, much longer].

Thank you very much.
Peace!
 

Mister Micawber

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Joined
Sep 26, 2004
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English Teacher
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English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
Japan
All OK again, Jandi. 'Any minute' is a little sooner than the others, but everything else is reasonably synonymous.
 
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