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One of my friends says "I have looked anywhere for my socks." is not correct. He says "I have looked everywhere for my socks." is correct. Is that right? Why cant we use "anywhere" in this sentence? And he says after "any" we should use a plural verb. For example: Any of these shirts are nice. Or Any of these shirts fit you. But I think we should use a singular verb with "any". Could you explain? Thanks.
 

emsr2d2

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"I have looked everywhere for my socks" - correct.
"I have looked anywhere for my socks" - incorrect.

"I haven't looked anywhere for my socks" - correct (meaning "I have not looked for my socks").
"I haven't looked everywhere for my socks" - correct (meaning "I have looked in some places but not all possible places").
"I have looked in a few places for my socks" - correct (meaning same as previous statement).
 
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Thanks, but doesn't "I have looked anywhere for my socks" mean "I have looked in all the places"? As I know, we can use "any" to say it is not important which one. For example: You can speak to any teacher about your problem. Doesn't "anywhere" mean "in ANY place" (for emphasis)? Please can you answer my second question about the form of the verb after "any" in the first post?
 

emsr2d2

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Thanks, but doesn't "I have looked anywhere for my socks" mean "I have looked in all the places"? As I know, we can use "any" to say it is not important which one. For example: You can speak to any teacher about your problem. Doesn't "anywhere" mean "in ANY place" (for emphasis)? Please can you answer my second question about the form of the verb after "any" in the first post?

No.

I have looked everywhere for my socks = I have looked in all the places

We would not say "I have looked anywhere for my socks".

Q - Have you looked anywhere for your socks yet? (Have you looked at all?)
A - Yes. I've looked everywhere and I can't find them
or
A - I've looked in a few places but there are still some places left to look.

Q - Have you looked everywhere for your socks?
A - Yes, I've looked everywhere and I can't find them
or
A - No. I haven't looked everywhere but I have looked in a lot of places.

You can't assume that the use of "any" is reflected in the use of "anywhere".

We generally use "anywhere" in the interrogative and the negative, but not in positive statements. (There are exceptions to this, such as "My socks could be anywhere").

Q - Have you looked anywhere for your socks yet?
A - No. I haven't looked anywhere for them.

The question means "Have you even started looking for your socks yet?" and the answer means "No, I haven't even looked in one single place yet".
 

bhaisahab

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