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Hello!

Is there a difference between the two following sentences?:


I'm not available at that time anymore.

I'm not available at that time any longer?


Thanks

El
 

banderas

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Hello!

Is there a difference between the two following sentences?:


I'm not available at that time anymore.

I'm not available at that time any longer?


Thanks

El
In theory, we use "any more" for events and
we use "any longer" for processes
is "not being available at that time" a process or an event?;-)
In practice, "he could stand the pain any longer".
Pain is a process, in the sense of a continual action
but any more could be used in informal speech.:)
 

Will17

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Thanks Banderas.Could I have the opinion of a native speaker, please?THanks
 

Will17

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up!

I don't really understand the "process and non process" theory, could someone else help me please?
 

vil

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Hi Will17,

There are two very brief and clear definitions of the “confusing” words.

process = a series of actions, changes, or functions bringing about a result: the process of digestion; the process of obtaining a driver's license.

non-process = when the process stumbles or halts, state, condition, situation, status.

Regards.

V.
 

naomimalan

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Thanks Banderas.Could I have the opinion of a native speaker, please?THanks

Sorry to disagree with Banderas:cry: because I really appreciate his (her?) posts but in fact the two terms are interchangeable if you're talking about something that has stopped happening or is no longer true.

(see "Collins Cobuild English Dictionary", 1995 : "any: 6"
"Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English", Fourth Edition: "anymore")
 

banderas

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Sorry to disagree with Banderas:cry: because I really appreciate his (her?)his posts but in fact the two terms are interchangeable if you're talking about something that has stopped happening or is no longer true.

(see "Collins Cobuild English Dictionary", 1995 : "any: 6"
"Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English", Fourth Edition: "anymore")
Thanks for your post.:)

I don't buy books any more. (or any longer)?
I can not wait any longer. I need to go.(or any more)?
Is there realy no difference?;-)
Any native speakers, please?
 

vil

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Attention: I'm not a teacher.

Hi

There is again my two cents contribution concerning the matter in question.

There is no doubt about the fact that in practice, exclusion occurs every day. I made a brief exploration concerning the usage of the adverbs “anymore” and “any longer” which led me nowhere. I didn’t obtain a definite result. I think we have to make a difference between anymore and any more. On the analogy of the naomimalan's statement, I am sceptical about Banderas' rule. Presumably there is such rule, but not very many follow it.

There are further examples which should to put the present theme in a favorable light.

What's more, as you start reading, he's not a character any longer, he's real. (state)
So don't put it off any longer. (action)
None of his lyrics are a mystery any longer. (event)
Pain she had been done with, which she should not have to feel any longer. (action)
I can't wait for spring any longer.

In standard American English the word anymore is often found in negative sentences: They don't live here anymore. But anymore is widely used in regional American English in positive sentences with the meaning “nowadays”: “We use a gas stove anymore” (Oklahoma informant in DARE). Its use, which appears to be spreading, is centered in the South Midland and Midwestern states, as well as in the Western states that received settlers from those areas. The earliest recorded examples are from Northern Ireland, where the positive use of anymore still occurs.

anymore = a) any longer; at the present
b) From now on: We promised not to quarrel anymore.

any longer (adv.) at the present or from now on; usually used with a negative
Synonym: anymore
any longer (idiom)

1.With added length, as in

If this skirt were any longer it would sweep the floor.

2. Still, any more, as in

They don't make this model any longer. This negative form is often put as no longer.

any more

not anymore = not any longer:

Nick doesn't live here anymore. (action)
She told me not to phone her anymore. (action)

no longer/not any longer used when something used to happen or be true in the past but does not happen or is not true now:

The extra workers won't be needed any longer.
It's no longer a secret.
anymore = still: at present and continuing from a point in the past ( used in negative statements and questions )
They sure don't make them like this anymore!


from now on: from the present and ongoing ( used in negative statements and questions )
I'm not tolerating this anymore. (action)


nowadays: these days ( nonstandard or regional ) ( used in positive sentences )
We always use a taxi anymore.


anymore or any more?
Anymore is an adverb: She doesn't live here anymore.Don't you eat out anymore?
The two-word form any more refers to any unspecified additional amount, as in Is there any more pasta left? The two should not be confused.
If you don't like pizza "anymore" (any longer), then you probably don't want to eat "any more" (an additional amount) of it.
Do you read much anymore? (action)

If you do that anymore, I'll leave. (action)

The Washingtonian is too sophisticated to believe anymorein solutions. (action)

Any longer; a. at the present: Do they make this model anymore? b. From now on: We promised not to quarrel anymore.

Regards.

V.
 

banderas

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Hi

There is again my two cents contribution concerning the matter in question.

There is no doubt about the fact that in practice, exclusion occurs every day. I made a brief exploration concerning the usage of the adverbs “anymore” and “any longer” which led me nowhere. I didn’t obtain a definite result. I think we have to make a difference between anymore and any more. On the analogy of the naomimalan's statement, I am sceptical about Banderas' rule. Presumably there is such rule, but not very many follow it.
And this is why I wrote in my original post:

"In theory, we use "any more" for events and
we use "any longer" for processes
is "not being available at that time" a process or an event?;-)
In practice, "he could stand the pain any longer".
Pain is a process, in the sense of a continual action
but any more could be used in informal speech.:)
Which simply means that it doesn not really matter what form you use. What I learned on these forums is that:"The reality is, to be truly fluent and conversant, one needs to learn a couple of Englishes: the real English that people actually speak and the Institutional English used in formal communication. In my own view, the latter is not so much a language as a set of arbitrary, socially demanded conventions. I have yet to meet a single English speaker who speaks so-called "Standard English."
Thank you JJM Balantyne!;-)
So when I said "In theory" I meant Standard/Institutional English. when I said "In practice" I meant the "real" English. It is like the argument over "to me and for me" forms. It does not matter in the real English if you say " any longer or any more" although I personaly am not sure if I said " I can not wait any more". I would say "I can not wait any longer" instead. Can any native speaker comment on this example, please?

V.
d
 

naomimalan

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Thanks for your post.:)

I don't buy books any more. (or any longer)?
I can not wait any longer. I need to go.(or any more)?
Is there realy no difference?;-)
Any native speakers, please?

Despite what the dictionaries say, the second sentence does sound a bit weird to me with "any more", Banderas. Here I would definitely be inclined to put "any longer" rather than any more: "I can't wait any longer."

So far, I haven't found anything in the grammar books that would substantiate a theory in favour of a distinction but I'll keep on searching.
What about you? :-D:-D
 

banderas

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Despite what the dictionaries say, the second sentence does sound a bit weird to me with "any more", Banderas. Here I would definitely be inclined to put "any longer" rather than any more: "I can't wait any longer."

So far, I haven't found anything in the grammar books that would substantiate a theory in favour of a distinction but I'll keep on searching.
What about you? :-D:-D
Hi Naomilan, thanks you post.

I think, in general we can use either but we shoild bear in mind that there are some verbs that imply an ongoing process like "wait", "look for" etc. and I would be inclined to say:
I can not wait any longer.
I can not look for it any longer.

It all depends on the context so please consider such a situation:
1. I was waiting for someone who was late and I said to myself: " No, I can not wait any longer (not any more), I've got to go". The process of waiting and your time is important here and how long you wait.

2. I was waiting for someone who was late and I decided not to wait any longer (not any more). Next day this person calls me saying: I am sorry, can we arrange another meeting, please?" And I say: "I am afraid not, I don't believe you would come this time. I do not want to wait for you any more." I I said yes, this would mean that I would take risk to wait for the person once more. In fact I can not wait any more because I hate waiting for people. I hate when someone is late!

Does it make sense to English native speakers? I believe it may do;-), please let me know.
Regards
Banderas
 

naomimalan

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Hi Naomilan, thanks you post.

I think, in general we can use either but we shoild bear in mind that there are some verbs that imply an ongoing process like "wait", "look for" etc. and I would be inclined to say:
I can not wait any longer.
I can not look for it any longer.

It all depends on the context so please consider such a situation:
1. I was waiting for someone who was late and I said to myself: " No, I can not wait any longer (not any more), I've got to go". The process of waiting and your time is important here and how long you wait.

2. I was waiting for someone who was late and I decided not to wait any longer (not any more). Next day this person calls me saying: I am sorry, can we arrange another meeting, please?" And I say: "I am afraid not, I don't believe you would come this time. I do not want to wait for you any more." I I said yes, this would mean that I would take risk to wait for the person once more. In fact I can not wait any more because I hate waiting for people. I hate when someone is late!

Does it make sense to English native speakers? I believe it may do;-), please let me know.
Regards
Banderas

I think your analysis is 100%correct, Banderas. The choice of “any longer” to the exclusion of “any more” implies as you suggest, an ongoing process with verbs like “look for” and “wait”; also, as you suggest, the notion of time is relevant.
I had been racking my brains trying to find a context where “any longer” wouldn’t work but I couldn’t come up with anything. But I see you’ve found it with your example 2 about the person who calls you to apologise for not turning up and wants to arrange another meeting, which you refuse. Here your choice of any more (“I don’t want to wait for you any more”) seems to me the only possible choice.
To get back to the type of verb compatible with “any longer” to the exclusion of “any more”, I think a lot of verbs would be compatible as long as in context they imply an “ongoing process”. Imagine, for example, I’m trying to put a screw in a wall so as to hang a picture and the screw keeps falling out. After a while, I could say, “I’m not going to carry on trying to put in this screw any longer. It’s a waste of time.” And so on…
It remains to be seen whether with “any more” to the exclusion of “any longer” we can find contexts for other verbs apart from “look for” and “wait”. I’m sure it’s possible. What about you?
 

banderas

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I think your analysis is 100%correct, Banderas. The choice of “any longer” to the exclusion of “any more” implies as you suggest, an ongoing process with verbs like “look for” and “wait”; also, as you suggest, the notion of time is relevant.
I had been racking my brains trying to find a context where “any longer” wouldn’t work but I couldn’t come up with anything. But I see you’ve found it with your example 2 about the person who calls you to apologise for not turning up and wants to arrange another meeting, which you refuse. Here your choice of any more (“I don’t want to wait for you any more”) seems to me the only possible choice.
It remains to be seen whether with “any more” to the exclusion of “any longer” we can find contexts for other verbs apart from “look for” and “wait”. I’m sure it’s possible. What about you?

Hi Naomimalan,
What I thought is that dictionaries are not always reliable. If they say "any longer"="any more", it is weird to me. These two structures exist not for nothing so there must be a slight difference in use. I do not remember if it was RonBee or BobK (perhaps both of them) who said that we do need the context in order to figure out a meaning of English words. Anglika also asks for context when answering some posts. In general, I agree that "any longer" and "any more" are interchangable.
 
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naomimalan

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Hi Naomimalan,
What I thought is that dictionaries are not always reliable. If they say "any longer"="any more", it is weird to me. These two structures exist not for nothing so there must be a slight difference in use. I do not remember if it was RonBee or BobK (perhaps both of them) who said that we do need the context in order to figure out a meaning of English words. Anglika also asks for context when answering some posts. In general, I agree that "any longer" and "any more" are interchangable.

“What I thought is that dictionaries are not always reliable. If they say "any longer"="any more", it is weird to me.
I once heard that lexicologists have an extremely limited amount of time to define a word and find examples. Maybe that explains why their definitions are not always reliable. But I think it could also be that certain structures haven’t yet been researched – or else have been researched but incorrectly.
“ I do not remember if it was RonBee or BobK (perhaps both of them) who said that we do need the context in order to figure out a meaning of English words. Anglika also asks for context when answering some posts.”
Yes, context can be very important. Your para 2 higher up (about not waiting for a friend) illustrates this.
“. These two structures exist not for nothing so there must be a slight difference in use….. In general, I agree that "any longer" and "any more" are interchangable.”
I think what we said higher up does prove that for the most part these structures are interchangeable but not systematically. :-D:-D
 
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