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Offroad

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Please, teachers, could you proofread this for me?

1) Dear students, these are my words, those are book's authors'
2) Please dad, bring me mom's keys and uncle Jonh's as well
3) Which ones do you like best, mine paintings or dad's?

Please, How do I ask... for example, I'd like ask someone about which pencil she would like to take to the school. She has two options, Peter's pencil and Marisa's pencil, however, she is not allowed to see the pencils.

Question ............. ?
Answer: I prefer Marisa's.

Please, no formality is needed.
Thank you very much.
 
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Aligor

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Dear students, these are my words, those are book's authors'
"those are the book's authors" (several authors of one book) or maybe "books' authors" (authors of some books, both "authors" and "books" plural)

Number 2 is correct.

Number 3 should be "Which ones do you like best, my paintings or dad's?" "Mine" is used without a noun following it; if you wanted to use "mine" then the correct sentence would be: "Which ones do you like best, dad's paintings or mine?"

And about that pencil...

"Which pencil would you like to take to school, Peter's or Marisa's?" OR "Would you like to take to school Peter's pencil or Marisa's?" OR
"Would you like to take to school Peter's or Marisa's pencil?"
 

Offroad

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"those are the book's authors" (several authors of one book) or maybe "books' authors" (authors of some books, both "authors" and "books" plural)
Dear students, these are my words, those are book's authors'
Dear students, these are my words, those are the book's authors
Dear students, these are my words, and those are the book's authors' (words).
right?
Number 3 should be "Which ones do you like best, my paintings or dad's?" "Mine" is used without a noun following it; if you wanted to use "mine" then the correct sentence would be: "Which ones do you like best, dad's paintings or mine?"
oh yeah, Agree, stupid mistake. :oops:
And about that pencil...

"Which pencil would you like to take to school, Peter's or Marisa's?" OR "Would you like to take to school Peter's pencil or Marisa's?" OR
"Would you like to take to school Peter's or Marisa's pencil?"
Ok, but, actually, I was wondering how to start this same question with a "who/whom", and the answer would be, for example, Marisa. Is it possible?

many thanks
 

Anglika

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Ok, but, actually, I was wondering how to start this same question with a "who/whom", and the answer would be, for example, Marisa. Is it possible?

many thanks

You could start with "Whose":

Whose pencil will you take to school: Peter's or Marisa's?
 

Offroad

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You could start with "Whose":

Whose pencil will you take to school: Peter's or Marisa's?

Hmmm, we are very close to the point. Is there a way that the answer could be just... Marisa, instead of Marisa's?

Many thanks

My first try:
Dear students, these are my words, those are book's authors'

second:
Dear students, these are my words, and those are the book's authors' (words).

Don't they have the same meaning?



Thank you very much
 
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