[Grammar] Are these independent clauses?

Nanu1

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1. This is the women whose little boy is ill.
2. The women whose little boy is ill.


Here is my question. In the first, is "this is the woman" independent clause with subject and verb? and in the second, is (2) sentence has complete meaning I mean is it a independent clause? Do these sentences mean the same?
 

Raymott

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You are right about 1. However, 2 is not a sentence since there is no main (independent) clause.
 

Tarheel

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1. This is the woman whose little boy is ill.
2. The woman whose little boy is ill.


Here is my question. In the first, is "this is the woman an independent clause with subject and verb? and in the second, is (2) sentence has complete meaning I mean is it a independent clause? Do these sentences mean the same?

"This is the woman" is an independent clause as such. It is not an independent clause in your sentence. The second "sentence" is not a sentence.

(I haven't corrected everything, because it would be too much trouble.)
 

Tarheel

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This - subject
is - verb
the woman whose little boy is ill - noun phrase
 

Nanu1

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"This is the woman" is an independent clause as such. It is not an independent clause in your sentence. The second "sentence" is not a sentence.

(I haven't corrected everything, because it would be too much trouble.)

"This is the woman" is an independent clause as such. It is not an independent clause in your sentence. Could you tell me the independent clause and why "This is the woman" is not an independent clause?
 

Matthew Wai

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I think it is an independent clause, where 'woman' is modified by the adjective clause 'whose little boy is ill'.
 

Tarheel

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Read post 4.
 

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NOT A TEACHER


Hello, Nanu:

If you went up to a stranger on the street and said, "The woman whose little boy is ill," the stranger might reply: "Ok, her son is ill. Now tell me something about the woman."

You might reply: "The woman whose son is ill has just walked into the hospital."

Independent sentence: "The woman has just walked into the hospital."
Subordinate clause (that depends on the word "woman"): "whose son is ill."
 
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Matthew Wai

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2. The women whose little boy is ill.
It is a sentence if it is rewritten as 'The woman's little boy is ill'.
 

Nanu1

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This - subject
is - verb
the woman whose little boy is ill - noun phrase

Subject-verb-noun phrase (independent clause). Am I right?

1. This is the women whose little boy is ill. This sentence can be written as two independent clauses "
This is the woman. Her little boy is ill". Then "This is the woman" is the independent clause, right?
 

Nanu1

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It is a sentence if it is rewritten as 'The woman's little boy is ill'.

2. The women whose little boy is ill. If it is rewritten as 'The woman's little boy is ill'= 'Her little boy is ill' ,then it becomes an independent clause.
 
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emsr2d2

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2. The women whose little boy is ill.

You have changed the noun and consequently made the clause ungrammatical.
 

Matthew Wai

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1. This is the women whose little boy is ill. This sentence can be written as two independent clauses "This is the woman. Her little boy is ill". Then "This is the woman" is the independent clause, right?
This is the woman whose little boy is ill.
I consider it a complex sentence, where the blue part and the red part are an independent clause and a dependent clause (a relative clause) respectively.

'The woman's little boy is ill'= 'Her little boy is ill' ,then it becomes an independent clause.
I consider it a simple sentence.
 

Nanu1

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"This is the woman" here "this" is dummy subject?
 

Nanu1

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I would not call 'this' a dummy subject in that sentence.

This is the woman is, in effect, This woman is the woman (whose little boy is ill).

"This is the women whose little boy is ill" if it is complex sentence then please could you convert this sentence to simple sentence?
 

Matthew Wai

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This is the woman. Her little boy is ill.

They are two simple sentences.
 

Tarheel

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You started out (if I remember correctly) with a simple sentence. "The woman whose little boy is ill" is a noun clause. They are, in fact, quite common. Some noun clauses:

the president of the United States
the school principal
a fourth-grade teacher
the arresting officer
a peaceful protest
an angry man
a gentle rebuke
 
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