[Grammar] are these run-on?

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Pakhavit

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Dear teacher, can you help me check if I make any mistake please

If you always think like I still have time so this work can be done later, you will get no benefits from the procrastination.


1. Like (I still have time) so (this work can be done later) a run-on?

If you always think like I still have time, so this work can be done later; you will get no benefits from the procrastination. Is it better the way I changed?

2. Like in this sentence is act as a conjunction?

Most of us like to think that today is the time for rest and tomorrow is the time for catching up on the lessons.

1. That (today is the time for rest) and ( tomorrow is the time for..) run-on?

2. Most of us like to think that today is the time for rest , and tomorrow is the time for catching up on the lessons. correct now right?

I couldn't find any rule or example with two independent clauses under one subordinate clause, so I wasn't sure if I can use it. But it feels like a run-on to me.

Thank you very much.
 
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Raymott

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Dear teacher, can you help me check if I make any mistake please

If you always think like I still have time so this work can be done later, you will get no benefits from the procrastination.


1. Like (I still have time) so (this work can be done later) a run-on?
This construction with "like" is not English.
It's not a run-in sentence.

If you always think [STRIKE]like[/STRIKE] that I still have time, so this work can be done later; you will get no benefits from the procrastination. Is it better the way I changed?
No. There's nothing wrong with the punctuation of the first sentence.

2. Like in this sentence is act as a conjunction?
"Like" is inappropriate, but it would be a subordinating conjunction if it were correct.

Most of us like to think that today is the time for rest and tomorrow is the time for catching up on [STRIKE]the[/STRIKE] lessons.

1. That (today is the time for rest) and ( tomorrow is the time for..) run-on?
The punctuation of that sentence is good, as is the grammar.

2. Most of us like to think that today is the time for rest , and tomorrow is the time for catching up on the lessons. correct now right?
You can use a comma if you like.

I couldn't find any rule or example with two independent clauses under one subordinate clause, so I wasn't sure if I can use it. But it feels like a run-on to me.
It isn't.
Thank you very much.
R.
 
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