article for surgery

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musicgold

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Hello,

Should there be an article before surgery in the first sentence?

1. The doctor told us that the aneurysm had ruptured and she needed to have [ ] surgery.


Is ‘the’ before ‘telephone’ redundant? I am thinking that if we don’t need any article before ‘TV’ , why should we have one before ‘telephone’; after all we are talking about both the things in general.

2. I still didn't understand why I couldn't take a shower; and, why I couldn't use the telephone, watch TV, or read a book.

Thanks,

MG.
 

susiedqq

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Due to the storm, I couldn't use the telephone, watch the TV, or read a book.

I couldn't use a telephone, watch a TV program, or read a book.

I couldn't use the telephone, watch TV, or read a book.

All are OK to use.
 

David L.

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'telephone' is specific - it is the telephone in their house.

With the 'watch TV', we are not referring to their specific television set that is in the lounge, but the act of watching television:

Let's watch TV - there's a good movie on channel one.
She's sewing buttons on a blouse.
She's sewing the buttons I gave her on her blouse -(specific buttons, the ones I gave to her)
 

2006

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Hello,

Should there be an article before surgery in the first sentence? You don't need an article there, but you can use "the" in the following context.
The doctor told..................................she needed to have the surgery (that we previously talked about). Here "the" refers to a specific kind of surgery that was previously mentioned.
1. The doctor told us that the aneurysm had ruptured and she needed to have [ ] surgery.

MG.

2006
 

musicgold

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Thanks folks.

Code:
[SIZE=3][FONT=Times New Roman]Should there be an article before surgery in the first sentence? [B][COLOR=blue]No.[/COLOR][/B][/FONT][/SIZE]

Anglika,

I know that people don't use any article before surgery. My question is why not; Surgery is a countable noun.

Also, What would a doctor say if his patient has to have two surgeries?

'she needs to have surgeries'
 

Anglika

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"Surgery" is uncountable. It does not have a plural form in this context.

'she needs to have surgeries' The doctor would say "two surgical procedures" or [even more likely] "two operations" (or how every many are required).
 

puzzle

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David L.Re: article for surgery
'telephone' is specific - it is the telephone in their house.

With the 'watch TV', we are not referring to their specific television set that is in the lounge, but the act of watching television:

Let's watch TV - there's a good movie on channel one.
She's sewing buttons on a blouse.
She's sewing the buttons I gave her on her blouse -(specific buttons, the ones I gave to her)


Some terrible things happan to me, I couldn't use telephone, watch TV, or read book.

Is this sentence ok? Please.
 

2006

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Some terrible things happan to me, I couldn't use telephone, watch TV, or read book.

Is this sentence ok? no
Some terrible things happened to me(;)(.) I couldn't use (a)(the) telephone, watch TV or read a book.

By the way, I don't agree that "surgery" in uncountable, but I agree that 'operation' is what is usually said.
He had four (operations)(surgeries) last year.

Please.
2006
 

puzzle

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2006,Thank you!:cool:
 

Anglika

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By the way, I don't agree that "surgery" in uncountable, but I agree that 'operation' is what is usually said.

He had four (operations)(surgeries) last year.

Seriously this must be a cultural difference. "Surgeries" here would be interpreted as the consultative interviews conducted by doctors or politicians, or places of work for doctors. I have never encountered it as referring to multiple surgical procedures.
 

albertino

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The Longman has the following definition on this:
plural surgeries
1
[uncountable]medical treatment in which a surgeon cuts open your body to repair or remove something inside
ᅳsee also operation
surgery on
She required surgery on her right knee.
surgery for
emergency surgery for chest injuries
in surgery
She was in surgery for two hours Thursday.
major/minor surgery major heart surgery have/undergo surgery He underwent surgery to remove a blood clot.
ᅳsee also cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery
2
[uncountable] especially American English the place where operations are done in a hospital
American Equivalent: operating room British Equivalent: theatre Dr. Hanson is in surgery.
3
[countable] British English a place where a doctor or dentist gives treatment
American Equivalent: office
4
[uncountable] British English a regular period each day when people can see a doctor or dentist
American Equivalent: office hours Surgery is from 9am - 1pm on weekdays.
5
[countable] British English a special period of time when people can see a Member of Parliament to discuss problems

(Not a teacher)
 

albertino

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According to the Merriam-webster dictionary, surgeries is the plural of surgery.

surgery - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
Well, if "surgery" is used as a count noun, it has a plural form. However, it has a different meaning with its uncount form.
As a count noun, it means a doctor's or dentist's office in AE, but a doctor's or dentist's surgery in BE. So, we can say, "There are many surgeries in this building."
(Not a teacher):cool:
 

2006

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Well, if "surgery" is used as a count noun, it has a plural form. However, it has a different meaning with its uncount form.
As a count noun, it means a doctor's or dentist's office in AE, really??? I never heard it used that way in AE! but a doctor's or dentist's surgery in BE. So, we can say, "There are many surgeries in this building."
(Not a teacher):cool:
2006
 

2006

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You can find the answer by searching the terms in google.
Here is one of them.
(Not a teacher)
I think you are confusing yourself. If you see a sign, such as 'Vascular Surgery', on an office door, it doesn't mean that office is called a 'surgey'. It means the doctor is a specialist in vascular surgery. Doctors offices or clinics in North America are called offices and clinics, not "surgeries".
 

albertino

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I think you are confusing yourself. If you see a sign, such as 'Vascular Surgery', on an office door, it doesn't mean that office is called a 'surgey'. It means the doctor is a specialist in vascular surgery. Doctors offices or clinics in North America are called offices and clinics, not "surgeries".
Excuse me, I would like to hear the views of AE teachers on this.:roll: Please correct me if I am wrong. Thanks.

(Maybe what I had said in my previous posting was unclear enough. I mean "surgery" can be countable if it means the room or office where a doctor or dentist works. Its equivalent is the doctor's or dentist's office, not that "surgery" means "medical operation or treatment". My apology.)
 
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vil

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Attention: I'm not a teacher.

Hi....

I back up the Albertino and Musicgold's arguments.

I think , the following excerpts from different Dictionary would stand some NES in good stead.
surgery (n) = the place where you go to see your doctor: surgery British English, office American English
surgery (n) = [Countableor Uncountable] a place where you can go to ask advice from or receive treatment from a doctor or dentist:
If you come to the surgery (US office) at 10.30, the doctor will see you then.

surgery (n) = branch of medicine: the branch of medicine that deals with diseases and conditions treated by operation or manipulation, or the range of diseases treated in this way

surgery (n) = operating room: a hospital or clinic room where surgery is performed
(a room in a hospital equipped for the performance of surgical operations)
An operating room or a laboratory of a surgeon or of a hospital's surgical staff.

"great care is taken to keep the operating rooms aseptic" [syn: operating room]

surgery (n) = U.K. doctor's office: a doctor's, dentist's, or veterinarian's office
1.Any arrangement where people arrive and wait for an interview with certain people, similar to a doctor's surgery.
Our MP will be holding a surgery in the village hall on Tuesday.

Regards.

V.
 
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