as of

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Buno

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Feb 17, 2010
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Hi Everyone,

Could you help me understand the difference between:
"this kind of studies has been carried on for long time"
and
"this kind of studies has been carried on as of long time"

I found the form "as of" in the dictionary but I cannot understand in which context I can use it. in fact I think that the way I used it is not correct.

thank you,

Buno :shock:
 

Vivianlj

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May 25, 2010
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Hi Buno,
"as of (a time)" means up/by (a time). Look at this sentence:
As of last week he was still unmarried.
It is equal to: Up to last week he was still unmarried.

Sometimes it also refers to "in term of; considering" Eg:The property belongs to her as of right.
It is equal to:The property belongs to her in terms of right.

That is my understanding. Hope helpful!
 
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Raymott

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"as of" also means "from".
"As of today, we'll do it my way".
So, you can see it means two opposite things: up until, and from/since. For this reason, it's best avoided, in my opinion. There are always better, less ambiguous options.

"As of 20th May, we had $15,000." ->
"Up until 20th May, we made $15,000."
"On 20th May, we had $15,000."

"As of today ..." -> "From today ..."
"As of 21st May, we've made $7,000" -> "Since 21st May ..."

If you see "as of" sometimes you have to guess from the context what it means.
 

Buno

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Joined
Feb 17, 2010
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Student or Learner
thank you for your useful links and explanation!

Buno :-D
 
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