badly built

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navi tasan

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1-The house in which I am living is built badly.
2-The house in which I am living is badly built.

Is there a difference between these two sentences?
 

BobK

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1-The house in which I am living is built badly.
2-The house in which I am living is badly built.

Is there a difference between these two sentences?

Not a lot. Some speakers would prefer 'The house ... is built badly' ['built badly' defines the way it is now, because of its having been badly built in the first place] (in other words, 'the house ... was badly built'). But I've heard both orders with 'is' and no attempt at conveying a difference in meaning.

b
 

BobK

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Of course, I didn't mention it but I suppose there may be someone who doesn't know - there's only one possible order when "badly-built' is used before the noun (either 'attributive' or 'predicative', I know it's one or the other, but formal grammar isn't my strong point - perhaps someone can help me out here?):

This is a badly-built house :tick:
This is a built-badly house :cross:

b
 
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