both/ both of

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blacknomi

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Both of you are right. (Correct)
You both are right. (Correct)
You are both right. (Correct)

I feel a bit frustrated(no bother at all, I mean) when explaining why this doesn't sound natural.
"Both you are right." :?:

Is there anyone can tell? :)
 

blacknomi

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X Mode said:
You are there. I am here. Everybody is there, and everybody is here. But that's neither here nor there.

Have you heard or read that one before? "That's neither here nor there."

:?: :D

No idea, Sir. Is that a song or poem?

But I do read the this there, "where are you from?", and found Proud and you are both here and there. [Important and relevant] :shock:
 

Steven D

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blacknomi said:
X Mode said:
You are there. I am here. Everybody is there, and everybody is here. But that's neither here nor there.

Have you heard or read that one before? "That's neither here nor there."

:?: :D

No idea, Sir. Is that a song or poem?

But I do read the this there, "where are you from?", and found Proud and you are both here and there. [Important and relevant] :shock:


Proudtobe thinks she is here, but I'm here. She's there. I think you're over there. There's a chance I could be over here if I'm not here. Are you there?

:shock: :?: :shock: :?: :D

No, it's not a song. It's just an expression.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=53344&dict=CALD


http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=8&q=here

Idiom:
neither here nor there
Unimportant and irrelevant.
 

blacknomi

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blacknomi said:
Casiopea said:
blacknomi said:
1. My parents both are teachers. :( (Why? :shock: )
2. You both are correct. :D

In 2., 'both' defines 'You' as plural (Note that, 'You' is ambiguous. It can be singular or plural in number), whereas in 1., 'both' defines 'My parents' as two people. A tad redundant, wouldn't you agree? In terms of nature, we have but two parents. :D

Okay. I'm going to go back by time machine. :(

Casiopea said:
Question to ponder
Given 1., what's the function of both in 2. and 3.?
1. Both Pete and Josh are nice. (Conjunction)
2. Pete and Josh both are nice.
3. Pete and Josh are both nice.

2. Adjective.
3. I don't know. Could be a adverb because it comes after be verb. :?:

Given from the example sentence, then compare:
4. Pete and Josh both are nice.
5. My parents both are teachers.
==> I do agree since 'both' indicates two different references, it COULD be a tad redundant, however, I would prefer to say that 'both' functions as an emphasis over the two different things(rather than unnecessary redundancy).

What about?
My children, Pete and Josh, are both nice. :D
My children, Pete and Josh, both are nice. :?:

Cas?
 

alexandre42

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X Mode said:
alexandre42 said:
X Mode said:
blacknomi said:
X Mode said:
Yes, "you" is only part of the complete subject. It's the object of "of". Both of us definitely agree on that.
:D

Where am I? :shock:

You are there. I am here. Everybody is there, and everybody is here. But that's neither here nor there.

Have you heard or read that one before? "That's neither here nor there."

:?: :D

Where do you read that's neither here nor there ?

I am going to sleep now .

I've heard it, and I've said it.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=53344&dict=CALD

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=2&q=here

That means something is insignifiant
 

Casiopea

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a. Pat and Sam are both nice. (Pronoun)
b. They are both nice. (Pronoun)
c. Both are nice. (Pronoun)
d. Both of them are nice. (Pronoun/Substansive)
e. Pat and Sam are both single and nice. (Conjunction)
f. He is (pretending to be) both candidates. (Adjective)

Ambiguity
Pat and Sam are both single and nice.
=> Is it that, Both Pat and Sam are single and nice or that Pat and Sam are both single and nice?

Repair
Both Pat and Sam are single and nice. :D
Pat and Sam both are single and nice. :D
Pat and Sam are both single and nice. (Intonantion) :D

All the best, :D
 

blacknomi

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It's crystal clear now. Thank you very much, my Cassie. <many hugs> :D


I might have another question about 'both', I'll see if I had any and will let you know. :shock: :)
 

Steven D

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blacknomi said:
It's crystal clear now. Thank you very much, my Cassie. <many hugs> :D


I might have another question about 'both', I'll see if I had any and will let you know. :shock: :)

So, you'll see if you have any, and then you'll let her know, right?

:wink: :D :idea: :shock: :D
 

blacknomi

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X Mode said:
blacknomi said:
It's crystal clear now. Thank you very much, my Cassie. <many hugs> :D


I might have another question about 'both', I'll see if I had any and will let you know. :shock: :)

So, you'll see if you have any, and then you'll let her know, right?

:wink: :D :idea: :shock: :D

blacknomi,
You
might have another question or might not have. When you are talking about an imaginary situation, use present tense.

:)
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
I might have another question about 'both'. I'll see if I had any and will let you know. :shock: :)

:wink: I believe X Mode is referring to the Conditional:

1. If I have any, I will let you know.
2. If I *had any, I will let you know.

Note that, the phonetic similiarities between have and had,

ha[v] (voiced inter-dental fricative)
ha[d] (voiced dental stop)

might account for why speakers from X language, use had in place of have, especially when pressed for time. :oops:

All the best, :D
 

blacknomi

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blacknomi said:
X Mode said:
blacknomi said:
It's crystal clear now. Thank you very much, my Cassie. <many hugs> :D


I might have another question about 'both', I'll see if I had any and will let you know. :shock: :)

So, you'll see if you have any, and then you'll let her know, right?

:wink: :D :idea: :shock: :D

blacknomi,
You
might have another question or might not have. When you are talking about an imaginary situation, use present tense.

:)

blacknomi,
When you are talking about uncertain events or situations, use 'have'.
When you are talking about an imaginary situation, use 'had'.

:) :) :) :) :)
 

Casiopea

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blacknomi said:
I might have another question about 'both', I'll see if I had any and will let you know. :shock: :)

Do you mean? :D

I'll see if I had (written) any and will let you know.

blacknomi said:
When you are talking about an imaginary situation, use present tense.

I'm confused. :cry: Is is 'present tense' or 'had'? :cry:

blacknomi said:
When you are talking about an imaginary situation, use 'had'.
 

blacknomi

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Casiopea said:
blacknomi said:
I might have another question about 'both', I'll see if I had any and will let you know. :shock: :)

Do you mean? :D

I'll see if I had (written) any and will let you know.

blacknomi said:
When you are talking about an imaginary situation, use present tense.

I'm confused. :cry: Is is 'present tense' or 'had'? :cry:

blacknomi said:
When you are talking about an imaginary situation, use 'had'.

He he. I have edited this post. Have you read it?
I saw ambiguity in my original sentence.

I might have another question. I'll let you know if I had any.
I was trying to say that I don't have questions about the usage of 'both' by far. So I would let you know if I had any, which is contrary to the fact.

Why did I use 'will' instead of 'would'? Because I might have questions in the future, but who knows? If I have any, I will let you know.

I combined two sentences.
1) I don't have questions now.
2) I will let you know because I might have in a future time.

Can I say that a mix conditional? :shock:
 

blacknomi

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Hi, one more question,

Cass and X mode both sing and dance.
This sentence is considered ambiguous, right? :-D
(1)Cass and X mode both sing and dance.
(2)Cass and X mode both sing and dance.


Therefore, to avoid the ambiguity, it's better to write in this way.
(1)Both Cass and x mode sing and dance.
(2)Cass and x mode sing and dance.


Left? :lol:
 

Tdol

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Is there any ambiguity? I don't see how two people both doing two actions can be construed in more than one way- they both do both.;-)
 

blacknomi

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#1- ___ of the two boys was sick. (1)Each (2)Every one

#2- ___ of the three boys was sick. (1)Each (2)Every one


Why not "every one" for #1 and "each" for #2? :?:
 
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