bring/carry/take?

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jvaldelv

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People bring flowers at the cemetery

I have 2 doubts: bring and the preposition at,

I have to use: bring, carry or take?
if bring is a verb of movement, the preposition has to be to
 

Casiopea

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jvaldelv said:
People bring flowers at the cemetery

I have 2 doubts: bring and the preposition at,

I have to use: bring, carry or take?
if bring is a verb of movement, the preposition has to be to

Bring flowers at the cemetery (ungrammatical use of *at)

bring...to (a location; a person may be at that location.)
bring...with (along with you)
take...to
take...with
carry...to
carry...with

Bring flowers to the cemetery.
Carry flowers to the cemetery.
Take flowers to the cemetery.

Bring flowers with you to the cemetery.
Take flowers with you to the cemetery.
Take flowers with you to the cemetery.

:D
 

jvaldelv

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Oct 22, 2003
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Student or Learner
Bring flowers to the cemetery.
Carry flowers to the cemetery.
Take flowers to the cemetery.

What difference in meaning is there in these three sentences?
 
P

Parmenion

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Essentially, all mean the same thing, although possibly it could depend upon context.
Bring flowers to the cemetery could possibly be construed as an order.
Carry . . . sounds more like narrative.
Take . . . sounds more like a request.
But, IMHO, there are no hard and fast rules, each is acceptable.
 

RonBee

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Parmenion said:
Essentially, all mean the same thing, although possibly it could depend upon context.
Bring flowers to the cemetery could possibly be construed as an order.
Carry . . . sounds more like narrative.
Take . . . sounds more like a request.
But, IMHO, there are no hard and fast rules, each is acceptable.

You are right, of course, that context is always important.

Re:
  • Bring flowers to the cemetery.
    Carry flowers to the cemetery.
    Take flowers to the cemetery.
They are all, in my opinion, in the nature of a request (mostly). I think the first one is most likely. The second one refers mostly to the mode of transportation. The third one seems like the answer to a question, thus:
  • A: What should I take to the cemetery?
    B: Take flowers to the cemetery.

Welcome to our friendly forum.

:D

Rhyming Riddles (Fiddle-de-fiddle; try a riddle.)
https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2248
 
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