British prestigious cinema characteristic flawless finish,

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Bushwhacker

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Is it possible to say this:

British prestigious cinema
characteristic flawless finish,


What I want to say is "A flawless finish characteristic of the British prestigious cinema"

Is it possible to say it like my proposal? Does it sound English? A good or bad one?

Thanks :-D:up:
 

David L.

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The whole point of a language is that it is not a mish-mash of words strung together haphazardly, but that the order of the words, their relation to one another, conveys meaning. You have followed a noun with an adjective without using a preposition. So:
(It is a shining example of ) British prestigious cinema with characteristic flawless finish.
Note: in both formats, you are referring to: of the prestigious films made worldwide ('prestigious cinema') you are specifically singling out that in Britain for discussion. As opposed to:
Prestigious British cinema : of all the films made in Britain, you are discussing only the 'prestigious'/the prestige end of the market.
 

Bushwhacker

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The whole point of a language is that it is not a mish-mash of words strung together haphazardly, but that the order of the words, their relation to one another, conveys meaning. You have followed a noun with an adjective without using a preposition. So:
(It is a shining example of ) British prestigious cinema with characteristic flawless finish.
Note: in both formats, you are referring to: of the prestigious films made worldwide ('prestigious cinema') you are specifically singling out that in Britain for discussion. As opposed to:
Prestigious British cinema : of all the films made in Britain, you are discussing only the 'prestigious'/the prestige end of the market.

Yes, I'm talking about British prestigious cinema, but the whole thing is not about that but on the flawless finish an specific British movie has. Excuse me, now I realize that perhaps it would have been required to add so more of the sentence. It is not the whole sentence; I beg your pardon. Would it be correct if I ad "British prestigious cinema characteristic flawless finish of this movie is an impressive one..." Would it be correct or not now? Several times, I've read paragraphs in English that have in a very contracted way what normally would be expressed with one or a couple of sentences, avoiding prepositions, conjunctions, and all possible connectors. So my interest in offering this expression is to know if would it be acceptable in a newspaper style, for instance, or, on the contrary, there is not way of admitting such a messy expression.

Thank You very much for your help. :-D:up:
 
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Anglika

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Yes, I'm talking about British prestigious cinema, but the whole thing is not about that but on the flawless finish an specific British movie has. Excuse me, now I realize that perhaps it would have been required to add so more of the sentence. It is not the whole sentence; I beg your pardon. Would it be correct if I ad "British prestigious cinema characteristic flawless finish of this movie is an impressive one..." Would it be correct or not now? Several times, I've read paragraphs in English that have in a very contracted way what normally would be expressed with one or a couple of sentences, avoiding prepositions, conjunctions, and all possible connectors. So my interest in offering this expression is to know if would it be acceptable in a newspaper style, for instance, or, on the contrary, there is not way of admitting such a messy expression.

Thank You very much for your help. :-D:up:

Without the full text, it is difficult to say if your phrase is good newspaper speak or not. My advice would be to avoid trying to write in this way as it is often not good English and sometimes incomprehensible. It is also more usually kept for reportage rather than discussion of culture, where the journalist is attempting to create a sense of immediacy.

British prestigious cinema characteristic flawless finish of this movie is an impressive one..."

With this sentence, it is not easy to identify just what is impressive. A possible alternative way to say this is:

The flawless finish of this move, characteristic of prestigious British cinema, is impressive.
 
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