Bun in the oven

Someone with a bun in the oven is...


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MASM

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I know, I was just continuing the list for fun:-D. Thank you for the extremely useful document!:up:
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Here in Maine, USA, there's a big distinction made between so-called natives and people "from away," also known as flatlanders, even if they're from Colorado or Nepal.

It's not enough to be born here. You're not a Mainer unless you were conceived here. There's a saying: Just 'cause the cat had her kittens in the oven, that don't make 'em biscuits."
 

Lynxear

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I've got it right too.

But it sounds somewhat humorous. Is it really okay to use such kind of idiom? :?:

It is humourous in a mild way but rarely would you say it directly to the person who is pregnant. The only time that might be acceptable would be if you were a very good friend of the person and were pretty sure she was pregnant, but you have not been told. Even then that is a risky thing to do. If she is not pregnant and her changing figure is just a weight gain, this would be offensive to her.

It is more often used between conversations with others about someone who may be pregnant.

I have seen some couples using a picture of a bun in an oven, to announce their pregnancy to their friends and relatives. It would be a funny way to make the announcement.
 

Milania

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Question please. Can you also use the expression to mean that you've got some good news to share?
 

Milania

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Okay. Thanks for clarifying, someone had told me it was possible that it could be related to good news. I guess they were wrong
 

emsr2d2

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It's only related to good news in the sense that most people consider that finding out that someone is pregnant is good news. However, the phrase can still be used even if the news of the pregnancy is a disaster!
 

bhaisahab

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I particularly like the French expression, 'Un polichinelle dans le tiroir' (a marionette in the drawer);-)
 

moodybuddie

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To be pregnant. It's informal though, so be careful when you use it.
 

edwardwilson

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This is new to me, I never heard it before but i got it now!
 

Yankee

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"Up the duff" is in some way linked to that phrase too. Don't ask me how. Something to do with duff pudding, which I've never even heard of.

Never heard "up the club/duff" in the U.S.
 

probus

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Never heard "up the club/duff" in the U.S.

I agree. Duff pudding is likewise unknown in North America, with one small exception. In Newfoundland there is a popular dessert called figgy duff. I gather it is like bread pudding with raisins.
 

Tdol

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Never heard "up the club/duff" in the U.S.

You will hear up the duff in the UK, but I am more familiar with in the club than up the club there.
 

kpawan

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I never heard this before but This idiom is good. Moreover, This is my first day here and I start learning new idioms. This is really great!
 

PeterCW

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"Duff" is simply another name for a boiled or steamed pudding. Traditionally boiled in a muslin or cheesecloth bag it would be round; I think the imagery should be obvious.

A range of BrE expressions seem to relate to each other through cookery:

Up the duff.
In the pudding club.
In the club.
Has a bun in the oven.
 
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Charlie Bernstein

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I couldn't vote because I could only pick one. In American English, pregnant and in trouble often mean the same thing.

Here in the US state of Maine, people whose roots here go back many generation often look down on newcomers. Just being born here isn't enough. You can only be a Mainer if you were conceived here.

They explain it with this saying: Just because a kitten's in the oven, that don't make it a biscuit.

(I know it's not grammatical. Mainers often aren't.)
 

PeterCW

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I couldn't vote because I could only pick one. In American English, pregnant and in trouble often mean the same thing.
It is just the same in British English.

Modern clothing has caused a lot of more poetic expressions to become redundant, such as her apron strings would not tie.
 

Tdol

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It is just the same in British English.

Modern clothing has caused a lot of more poetic expressions to become redundant, such as her apron strings would not tie.

That's a nice one, though old-fashioned.
 
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