Capitalization for Titles

Status
Not open for further replies.

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
The Rule of Law
Over the Blue Horizon
Learning How to Capitalize Is Easy And Fun

What are the bold words called? Is it a pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb??


What are the bold words called? <--is this question correct? why?
or should it be:
What are the bolded words called?
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
The Rule of Law
Over the Blue Horizon
Learning How to Capitalize Is Easy And Fun

What are the bold words called? Is it a pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb??


What are the bold words called? <--is this question correct? why?
or should it be:
What are the bolded words called?

1. preposition
2. article (definite)
3. infinitive particle

These are words not commonly capitalized in titles.
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
MikeNewYork said:
jack said:
The Rule of Law
Over the Blue Horizon
Learning How to Capitalize Is Easy And Fun

What are the bold words called? Is it a pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb??


What are the bold words called? <--is this question correct? why?
or should it be:
What are the bolded words called?

1. preposition
2. article (definite)
3. infinitive particle

These are words not commonly capitalized in titles.
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
jack said:
The Rule of Law
Over the Blue Horizon
Learning How to Capitalize Is Easy And Fun

What are the bold words called? Is it a pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb??


What are the bold words called? <--is this question correct? why?
or should it be:
What are the bolded words called?

1. preposition
2. article (definite)
3. infinitive particle

These are words not commonly capitalized in titles.


I think we can add conjunctions to the list.
e.g. and, as in Pride and Prejudice

For this reason, I'd say there is a mistake in Jack's last example because the word "and" is capitalized.

Say: words in bold, words in bold type/print, words in boldface

The adjective can be boldface or boldfaced, but not bolded.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
Here we often use 'emboldened' as well. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Susie Smith said:
Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
jack said:
The Rule of Law
Over the Blue Horizon
Learning How to Capitalize Is Easy And Fun

What are the bold words called? Is it a pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb??


What are the bold words called? <--is this question correct? why?
or should it be:
What are the bolded words called?

1. preposition
2. article (definite)
3. infinitive particle

These are words not commonly capitalized in titles.


I think we can add conjunctions to the list.
e.g. and, as in Pride and Prejudice

For this reason, I'd say there is a mistake in Jack's last example because the word "and" is capitalized.

Say: words in bold, words in bold type/print, words in boldface

The adjective can be boldface or boldfaced, but not bolded.

You are correct about short, coordinating conjunctions. I read a rule a while back that recommends capitalizing prepositions and conjunctions of five or more letters. There are other "rules" that may be different. :wink:
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
MikeNewYork said:
Susie Smith said:
Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
jack said:
The Rule of Law
Over the Blue Horizon
Learning How to Capitalize Is Easy And Fun

What are the bold words called? Is it a pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb??


What are the bold words called? <--is this question correct? why?
or should it be:
What are the bolded words called?

1. preposition
2. article (definite)
3. infinitive particle

These are words not commonly capitalized in titles.


I think we can add conjunctions to the list.
e.g. and, as in Pride and Prejudice

For this reason, I'd say there is a mistake in Jack's last example because the word "and" is capitalized.

Say: words in bold, words in bold type/print, words in boldface

The adjective can be boldface or boldfaced, but not bolded.

You are correct about short, coordinating conjunctions. I read a rule a while back that recommends capitalizing prepositions and conjunctions of five or more letters. There are other "rules" that may be different. :wink:

I know one that says prepositions of four or more letters should be capitalized. :wink:
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Susie Smith said:
I know one that says prepositions of four or more letters should be capitalized. :wink:

There ya' go. :lol:
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top