capitalization

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hela

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Dear teachers,

According to a rule (UK) it's possible not to capitalize (= not mandatory?) an adjective derived from a country or city if it's part of a common noun:

"Close the venetian blinds" / "He just loves danish pastry"
so would you say "I had an english muffin for breakfast" ?

All the best,
Hela
 
R

RedMtl

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Dear teachers,

According to a rule (UK) it's possible not to capitalize (= not mandatory?) an adjective derived from a country or city if it's part of a common noun:

"Close the venetian blinds" / "He just loves danish pastry"
so would you say "I had an english muffin for breakfast" ?

All the best,
Hela


Yes, I would say that. One might see otherwise, however. It is likely dependant upon the country of the English speaker.

Good luck!
 

BobK

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:up: But, paradoxically, when something really doesn't come from somewhere, it's more likely to be capitalized. For example, "Indian ink" doesn't come from India; the French for Indian ink is encre de Chine (I doubt if it comes from China either, though I'm open to correction). But I don't think it's common to write "indian ink". [But maybe I'm biased; I'd use capitals for Venetian blinds and Danish pastries too].

b

PS On second thoughts, I might well drop the capital if the adjective became a (common) noun: "For breakfast I just had coffee and a danish".
 
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RedMtl

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:up: But, paradoxically, when something really doesn't come from somewhere, it's more likely to be capitalized. For example, "Indian ink" doesn't come from India; the French for Indian ink is encre de Chine (I doubt if it comes from China either, though I'm open to correction). But I don't think it's common to write "indian ink". [But maybe I'm biased; I'd use capitals for Venetian blinds and Danish pastries too].

b

PS On second thoughts, I might well drop the capital if the adjective became a (common) noun: "For breakfast I just had coffee and a danish".

Actually, there is a strong case for the ink, as it was made at the time (not now, of course) coming from China. A less strong line of evidence for Egypt. Neither being India!

Also, of note for non-English users, it is more commonly called India Ink, not "indian" -- at least in North America. Geographically this makes much more sense, since the origin is a reference to geography, not culture. And "Indian" has quite a different meaning here, not always complementary.

Interestingly, it is indeed called "China Ink" as well -- in India! (This I have direct confirmation of, not just hearsay.);-)
 
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