carry to/for sb

nyggus

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Hi,

Which preposition should I use in the below sentence?

First, we will discuss what connotations these three methods carry for/to us.​

And does the sentence sound OK?

Thanks,
nyggus
 

tedmc

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Hi,

Which preposition should I use in the [STRIKE]below[/STRIKE] sentence below?
First, we will discuss what connotations these three methods carry [STRIKE]for/[/STRIKE]to us.​

And does the sentence sound OK?

Thanks,
nyggus

I know that words or expressions carry connotations but I am not sure about "methods". "Implications" could be a better word.
 

teechar

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And does the sentence sound OK?
No. Try:
First, we will discuss what connotations these three methods have.
or
First, we will discuss what implications these three methods have (for us).
 

nyggus

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No. Try:
First, we will discuss what connotations these three methods have.
or
First, we will discuss what implications these three methods have (for us).

Thanks. Can't we use carry? I took it from the collocation dictionary here, which gives two verbs for "verb + connotation": have and carry.

(Which doesn't mean that I will not use your proposition. Just want to know if carry is indeed wrong here.)
 

teechar

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I much prefer "have".
 

GoesStation

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If you do use "carry", you can end the sentence there and make the preposition question moot.
 

tedmc

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I much prefer "have".

"..implications the methods have" sounds much better to me.
What "methods" are we talking about?
 

nyggus

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"..implications the methods have" sounds much better to me.
What "methods" are we talking about?

"Implications" and "connotations" are two different words and have two different meanings. I don't see why methods—whatever they are—could not have connotations. If you think about a method, what does come to your mind? These are connotations, not implications.
 

nyggus

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If you do use "carry", you can end the sentence there and make the preposition question moot.

Thanks. And sorry - could you please explain what did you mean? I looked up "question mood", but it didn't help me understand the last part of your sentence.
 

Tdol

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He means that this would work:

First, we will discuss what connotations these three methods carry.

There is no need for anything after carry.
 

nyggus

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He means that this would work:

First, we will discuss what connotations these three methods carry.

There is no need for anything after carry.

Thanks. But the sentence have slightly a different meaning without the preposition. With the preposition, the authors say what connotations they see; without it, they kind of assume that the reader will see the same connotations.

Now I see I failed to give the full context of the sentence: several authors are writing what connotations in their opinion these methods have. It's a different situation from one author writing in first person plural, as many authors do.
 

GoesStation

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I looked up "question mood", but it didn't help me understand the last part of your sentence.
Look up the noun moot.
 

GoesStation

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If you do use "carry", you can end the sentence there and make the preposition question moot.
OP, what I meant was that if you omit the preposition and end the sentence at "carry", it no longer matters which preposition you need. The question becomes moot,​ or no longer relevant.
 
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