celebrator/celebrant

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RL

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Hi! :)

My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

Thank you! :D
 

RL

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Hi! :)

My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

Thank you! :D
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
RL said:
Hi! :)

My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

Thank you! :D

The American Heritage dictionary says:
cel·e·brant (sµl“…-br…nt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
————————————————————
USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean “a participant in a celebration” (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
RL said:
Hi! :)

My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

Thank you! :D

The American Heritage dictionary says:
cel·e·brant (sµl“…-br…nt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
————————————————————
USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean “a participant in a celebration” (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.
 

RL

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Susie Smith said:
RL said:
Hi! :)

My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

Thank you! :D

The American Heritage dictionary says:
cel·e·brant (sµl“…-br…nt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
————————————————————
USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean “a participant in a celebration” (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.

I see. Thanks, Susie Smith :)
 

RL

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Susie Smith said:
RL said:
Hi! :)

My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

Thank you! :D

The American Heritage dictionary says:
cel·e·brant (sµl“…-br…nt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
————————————————————
USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean “a participant in a celebration” (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.

I see. Thanks, Susie Smith :)
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
RL said:
Susie Smith said:
RL said:
Hi! :)

My english professor once mentioned that it's incorrect to use the word CELEBRANT (example: birthday celebrant), she says it's supposed to be CELEBRATOR. Is it true?! I still hear people use Celebrant more than Celebrator. Is there any difference between the 2?!

Thank you! :D

The American Heritage dictionary says:
cel·e·brant (sµl“…-br…nt) n. 1.a. A person who participates in a religious ceremony or rite. b. The priest officiating at the celebration of the Eucharist. 2. A participant in a celebration.
————————————————————
USAGE NOTE: Strictly speaking, celebrant should be reserved for an official participant in a religious ceremony or rite. In an earlier survey, however, a majority of the Usage Panel accepted the use of celebrant to mean “a participant in a celebration” (as in New Year's Eve celebrants). In this more general sense, celebrator is an undisputed alternative.

I see. Thanks, Susie Smith :)

You're welcome. :)
 
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