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Francois

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Where's the stress?
Are there several ways to pronounce it? What are they (in ASCII phonetic alphabet) ?

FRC
 

Casiopea

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Francois said:
Where's the stress?
Are there several ways to pronounce it? What are they (in ASCII phonetic alphabet) ?

FRC

1. sh'ka'go
2. shIh'ka'go (the [h] is unaspirated)
3. shIk'ka'go (the first [k] is unaspirated)

'a' is variable: [a] or [ae]
 
S

Susie Smith

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Francois said:
Two stresses? I'm still not sure how your examples sound like :-(

Let me try. This is the way I say it:

shi (with a short i as in ship)
ka (the a sounds like the interjection "ah")
go ( like the verb)

Stress the second syllable.
Chi CA go

:wink:
 

Francois

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Phonetic alphabet is useful for that purpose.
I know it's gonna be something like /shik@go/, but I can imagine several variations:
1. /'shik..gOu/
2. /'shik..go/
3. /sh..'k@gOu/
3. /sh..'k@go/
4. /shi'k@gOu/

I think you mean 4. then, but are there other pronunciations?

FRC
 

Casiopea

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Francois said:
Two stresses? I'm still not sure how your examples sound like :-(

Nope. I've used the symbol " ' " to represent a syllable break. :D

The stress is on the second syllable [ka]/[kae]:

Chi'ka'go

The first syllable houses a lax vowel, as in the sound of the "i" vowel in the word sit.

ChI'ka'go (pronunication #1) "Ch" is pronounced as [sh]

Note: The lax vowel syllable is closed by an unaspirated [h].

ChI[h]'ka'go "Ch" is pronounced as [sh]

For some speakers, [h] is omitted, leaving the lax vowel in an open syllable at a syllable boundary. In such cases, the following consonant is dragged across the syllable boundary to close the preceeding syllable,

ChIk'ka'go (pronunciation #2) "Ch" is pronounced as [sh]

For some speakers, syllable-final lax vowels are often reduced to schwa (i.e. the vowel sound in the), and schwa is often omitted syllable-finally,

Ch'ka'go (pronunciation #3) "Ch" is pronounced as [sh]

For some speakers, although rare, the lax vowel changes to a non-lax vowel. That is lax "I" becomes , as in see,

Chi'ka'go ==> (shee'ka'go) (Pronunciation #4)

There're probably more.
 

MikeNewYork

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Francois said:
Where's the stress?
Are there several ways to pronounce it? What are they (in ASCII phonetic alphabet) ?

FRC

I was born and raised in Chicago.

There are only two main pronunciations, and most of the people who live there use only the first.

chi CA go The main stress is on the second syllable.

1. shi (as in ship) + caw (rhymes with paw) + go (just like the verb go)
2. shi (as in ship) + cah (rymes with rah) + go (just like the verb go)
 

RonBee

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MikeNewYork said:
Francois said:
Where's the stress?
Are there several ways to pronounce it? What are they (in ASCII phonetic alphabet) ?

FRC

I was born and raised in Chicago.

There are only two main pronunciations, and most of the people who live there use only the first.

chi CA go The main stress is on the second syllable.

1. shi (as in ship) + caw (rhymes with paw) + go (just like the verb go)
2. shi (as in ship) + cah (rymes with rah) + go (just like the verb go)

Interesting. I am from St. Louis, and I have always pronounced it (and heard it pronounced) the second way. I guess natives and non-natives usually pronounce it differently (a little like Saint LouIS and Saint LouIE, I suppose).

:)
 
S

Susie Smith

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RonBee said:
MikeNewYork said:
Francois said:
Where's the stress?
Are there several ways to pronounce it? What are they (in ASCII phonetic alphabet) ?

FRC

I was born and raised in Chicago.

There are only two main pronunciations, and most of the people who live there use only the first.

chi CA go The main stress is on the second syllable.

1. shi (as in ship) + caw (rhymes with paw) + go (just like the verb go)
2. shi (as in ship) + cah (rymes with rah) + go (just like the verb go)

Interesting. I am from St. Louis, and I have always pronounced it (and heard it pronounced) the second way. I guess natives and non-natives usually pronounce it differently (a little like Saint LouIS and Saint LouIE, I suppose).

:)

New Orleans is another good example.
:wink:
 

Casiopea

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MikeNewYork said:
Francois said:
Where's the stress?
Are there several ways to pronounce it? What are they (in ASCII phonetic alphabet) ?

FRC

I was born and raised in Chicago.

There are only two main pronunciations, and most of the people who live there use only the first.

chi CA go The main stress is on the second syllable.

1. shi (as in ship) + caw (rhymes with paw) + go (just like the verb go)
2. shi (as in ship) + cah (rymes with rah) + go (just like the verb go)

paw and rah sound the same, don't they? :?
 

Francois

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Jun 15, 2004
I can look up 'paw' but I'm not sure how 'rah' is pronounced.
In the meantime I've found that: There's a .wav file to listen.
Is it the way you would pronounce it, Mike?

FRC
 

Casiopea

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Francois said:
I can look up 'paw' but I'm not sure how 'rah' is pronounced.
In the meantime I've found that: There's a .wav file to listen.
Is it the way you would pronounce it, Mike?

FRC

For me, paw, as in a pet's paw, is pronounced like, saw and rah, a cheer, is also pronounced like, saw. Hmm. Hopefully Mike will enlighten us. :D I love learning new things, don't you? 8)
 
A

Andy

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MikeNewYork wrote,
I was born and raised in Chicago.

There are only two main pronunciations, and most of the people who live there use only the first.

chi CA go The main stress is on the second syllable.

1. shi (as in ship) + caw (rhymes with paw) + go (just like the verb go)
2. shi (as in ship) + cah (rymes with rah) + go (just like the verb go)

Mike,

I was wondering why you sign your name Mike NewYork and appear have moved to the Big apple if you were born and raised in Chicago, wasn't it your kind of town. Funny about the two different pronounciations, and I thought that NY was the town that was so good they named it twice. :)
 

MikeNewYork

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RonBee said:
MikeNewYork said:
Francois said:
Where's the stress?
Are there several ways to pronounce it? What are they (in ASCII phonetic alphabet) ?

FRC

I was born and raised in Chicago.

There are only two main pronunciations, and most of the people who live there use only the first.

chi CA go The main stress is on the second syllable.

1. shi (as in ship) + caw (rhymes with paw) + go (just like the verb go)
2. shi (as in ship) + cah (rymes with rah) + go (just like the verb go)

Interesting. I am from St. Louis, and I have always pronounced it (and heard it pronounced) the second way. I guess natives and non-natives usually pronounce it differently (a little like Saint LouIS and Saint LouIE, I suppose).

:)

Yes, many other midwesterners use the second pronunciation. I don't know why that is. :wink:
 

RonBee

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Casiopea said:
paw and rah sound the same, don't they? :?

Not in my neck of the woods. Paw rhymes with caw or maw or saw, and rah rhymes with ah or la or fah.

:)
 
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