choose v. pursue v. dog

hhtt21

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"Why were there so many stray dogs in my town? And why did they always choose me to chase?Did they wait quietly in the woods, watching people go by? Then did they whisper to each other, “See that blond kid? That’s Larry Boyd—let’s go get
him”? I ran as fast as I could. But it’s so hard to run when you’re carrying a guitar case. It kept banging against my leg.
And I kept slipping in the snow. The dogs were catching up. They were howling and barking, trying to scare me to death."


http://readallgoosebumpsonline.blogspot.com.tr/2014/01/my-hairiest-adventure.html

Would you explain the difference between the sentences based on the context above?

1. "why did they always choose me to chase."
2. "
why did they always choose me to pursue."


​Thank you.
 

emsr2d2

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There is no difference between "chase" and "pursue" there (or anywhere else that I can think of).
 

tzfujimino

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An interesting title.
I wondered what it was all about when I read it.:)
 

teechar

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(or anywhere else that I can think of).
There can be.
A tradesman might chase (not pursue) a channel or a groove.
A student might pursue (not chase) a degree program.
 

Rover_KE

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No capital letters or closing punctuation.
 

tzfujimino

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"Why did they always choose me to dog?" doesn't make sense.
 

tzfujimino

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Ah, I see.
So, in that case, the pronoun "me" is the object of the verb "dog".
Thanks, Matthew.
 
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