clause+ tense

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moonwalker

Guest
It is hard for me to distinguish noun- clause from adverb-clause
when it comes to "when-clause".

Please help me!


1. Please compare two sentences below.

==========================
Tell me when you will finish your job.
Tell me when you have finshed your job.
==========================

Is there any difference between their meanings?

Or, is there any grammatical erorr?


2. And these two sentence.
===========================
Tell me when you will have finished your job.
Tell me when you will finish your job.
============================

Is there any difference between their meanings?

Or, is there any grammatical erorr?
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
moonwalker said:
It is hard for me to distinguish noun- clause from adverb-clause
when it comes to "when-clause".

Please help me!


1. Please compare two sentences below.

==========================
Tell me when you will finish your job.
Tell me when you have finshed your job.
==========================

Is there any difference between their meanings?

Or, is there any grammatical erorr?


2. And these two sentence.
===========================
Tell me when you will have finished your job.
Tell me when you will finish your job.
============================

Is there any difference between their meanings?

Or, is there any grammatical erorr?

1. Tell me when you're done.

when you're done functions as the object of the verb Tell. For example, Tell someone something; someone is replaced by the word me, and something is replaced by the clause when you are done. So, when you are done functions as an object, and objects are nouns. :D

Other examples
Let me know when you get off work.
Tell me what time you get off work.

Ambiguous
Tell me when you get off work. (There are two meanings)
Meaning#1: Tell me what time you get off work. (Noun)
Meaning #2: Tell me (about John) when you get off work. (Adverb)

when you get off work answers the question When?, like this,

Q: When should you tell me about John?
A: When you get off work. (Adv.)

Another example
2. Call me when you're done. (Adverb)

when you're done answers the question When?, like this,

Q: When should I call you?
A: When you are done.

All the best,
 
M

moonwalker

Guest
Casiopea said:
moonwalker said:
It is hard for me to distinguish noun- clause from adverb-clause
when it comes to "when-clause".

Please help me!


1. Please compare two sentences below.

==========================
Tell me when you will finish your job.
Tell me when you have finshed your job.
==========================

Is there any difference between their meanings?

Or, is there any grammatical erorr?


2. And these two sentence.
===========================
Tell me when you will have finished your job.
Tell me when you will finish your job.
============================

Is there any difference between their meanings?

Or, is there any grammatical erorr?

1. Tell me when you're done.

when you're done functions as the object of the verb Tell. For example, Tell someone something; someone is replaced by the word me, and something is replaced by the clause when you are done. So, when you are done functions as an object, and objects are nouns. :D

Other examples
Let me know when you get off work.
Tell me what time you get off work.

Ambiguous
Tell me when you get off work. (There are two meanings)
Meaning#1: Tell me what time you get off work. (Noun)
Meaning #2: Tell me (about John) when you get off work. (Adverb)

when you get off work answers the question When?, like this,

Q: When should you tell me about John?
A: When you get off work. (Adv.)

Another example
2. Call me when you're done. (Adverb)

when you're done answers the question When?, like this,

Q: When should I call you?
A: When you are done.

All the best,




I always thank you for your clear explanation. :D


I hope to see you again.

Bye bye~ :wink:
 
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