collocation

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Anonymous

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When words are used together regularly, rules are formed about their use not for grammatical reasons, but because of the association. 'Black and white' appear in that order because of collocation; they are always in that order and to put them the other way around seems wrong. For the same reason we 'make a mistake' when we 'do a test'. The reason for using these verbs with these is that we always do; this is collocation

Too simplistic.

Black and white probably started as black on white - it is "down in black on white".

Make refers to making some thing whereas do refers to a process - the student didn't make the test, the teacher did, the student underwent a process, but made a mistake.
 

Casiopea

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balck and white

Black and white probably started as black on white - it is "down in black on white".

black on white :?: Well, maybe for printed material; but, given the definitions below, it seems to me the modern us(ag)e of the collocation 'black and white' has more to do with the invention of color film, TV, movies than it does with the printing press.

back and white

adjective: "black-and-white film"; "a black-and-white TV"; "the movie was in black and white", "black-and-white photograph or slide".

Mind you, where the term "black and white" came from really has nothing to do with the fact that it is a collocation.

All that aside, I truly owe you for pointing out that "black and white" may have developed from reduced "on": *on -> *n -> *an -> *an' -> and. Now that's cool. thanx :)

Make refers to making some thing whereas do refers to a process - the student didn't make the test, the teacher did, the student underwent a process, but made a mistake.

Interesting point; however, I don't see how that is related to collocation. I believe the current explanation provided by UsingEnglish is suitable with regards to collocations and need not be altered.

By the way, is it just me or isn't it the case that both "make" and "do" refer to a process as well as to an action?

Based on my experience, speakers generally use "make" to express create X and use "do" elsewhere.

For example:

make my bed
make dinner
make a pot
do the dishes
do my homework

All the best,

Cas
 

Tdol

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I think 'make' generally looks at the product and 'do' at the activity. ;-)
 

RonBee

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Another collocations thread? :wink:

In AE we don't do a test. We take a test. We also:
  • take charge
    take over
    take a look
    take up (something)

:D
 

Tdol

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In BE, we use both verbs for tests. ;-)
 

rafyrafa

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Hello everyone,
My name is Rafy Rafaelyan and I am an English language teacher.
I am interested in the English collocations and grammar.
Could you tell me please what the meaning of the expression, "To join the fold." is?
I couldn't find it as a collocation in any dictionary.
Best regards, Rafy Rafaelyan.
 
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Red5

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Sorry for the late reply. As far as I can see in the examples given by Google, "Join the Fold" is used to describe someone joining a (religious) belief, although it also seems to be used with other connotations.

In fact, on further examinattion, a Fold is defined as "a group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given church".

Hope that helps. ;-)
 
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