Collocations

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Red5

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One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

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Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language
 
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RonBee

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Maybe we should start a collocations thread here. Hm?

make
  • make a mistake
    make a mess
    make a mention of (something)
    make a left turn

:)
 

shane

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Make a correction
Make an apology
Make friends
Make an appointment

:D
 

RonBee

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Make up
Make amends
Make time
Make dinner
Make enemies
Make peace
Make war

:)
 

RonBee

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take
  • take a hike
    take a pill
    take a minute
    take over
    take up
    take down
    take an interest in
    take on
 
C

CitySpeak

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Red5 said:
One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

Read more...

Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language


I heard someone say "They give a lot of value to their families."

Isn't "They place a lot of value on their families." more like how it would normally be said?

I think so.

give value to - or - place value on
 

RonBee

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CitySpeak said:
Red5 said:
One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

Read more...

Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language


I heard someone say "They give a lot of value to their families."

Isn't "They place a lot of value on their families." more like how it would normally be said?

I think so.

give value to - or - place value on

Yes, it should be place a lot of value on. I don't think the first one is even an English sentence.
 
C

CitySpeak

Guest
RonBee said:
CitySpeak said:
Red5 said:
One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

Read more...

Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language


I heard someone say "They give a lot of value to their families."

Isn't "They place a lot of value on their families." more like how it would normally be said?

I think so.

give value to - or - place value on

Yes, it should be place a lot of value on. I don't think the first one is even an English sentence.


That sentence was spoken by a German speaker. It is a grammatically correct sentence. Collocationally, it is wrong.
 

RonBee

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Grammar isn't everything.

:p
 
J

jwschang

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CitySpeak said:
RonBee said:
CitySpeak said:
Red5 said:
One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

Read more...
Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language

I heard someone say "They give a lot of value to their families."
Isn't "They place a lot of value on their families." more like how it would normally be said?
I think so.
give value to - or - place value on
Yes, it should be place a lot of value on. I don't think the first one is even an English sentence.

That sentence was spoken by a German speaker. It is a grammatically correct sentence. Collocationally, it is wrong.

It sounds like suits-talk. Give value to your shareholders, give value to the meeting, add value to this and that....
I think the speaker perhaps didn't mean placing value but giving value. Strange-speak nevertheless, when family relationships take on business jargon. :wink:
 
C

CitySpeak

Guest
jwschang said:
CitySpeak said:
RonBee said:
CitySpeak said:
Red5 said:
One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

Read more...
Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language

I heard someone say "They give a lot of value to their families."
Isn't "They place a lot of value on their families." more like how it would normally be said?
I think so.
give value to - or - place value on
Yes, it should be place a lot of value on. I don't think the first one is even an English sentence.

That sentence was spoken by a German speaker. It is a grammatically correct sentence. Collocationally, it is wrong.

It sounds like suits-talk. Give value to your shareholders, give value to the meeting, add value to this and that....
I think the speaker perhaps didn't mean placing value but giving value. Strange-speak nevertheless, when family relationships take on business jargon. :wink:


That's an interesting point. Collocations have context, just as individual vocabulary words do.

She - the speaker of this sentence - might have heard "give value" in business. She works for Krups in the states and her first language is German.

:idea: :shock: :)
 
C

CitySpeak

Guest
jwschang said:
CitySpeak said:
RonBee said:
CitySpeak said:
Red5 said:
One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

Read more...
Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language

I heard someone say "They give a lot of value to their families."
Isn't "They place a lot of value on their families." more like how it would normally be said?
I think so.
give value to - or - place value on
Yes, it should be place a lot of value on. I don't think the first one is even an English sentence.

That sentence was spoken by a German speaker. It is a grammatically correct sentence. Collocationally, it is wrong.

It sounds like suits-talk. Give value to your shareholders, give value to the meeting, add value to this and that....
I think the speaker perhaps didn't mean placing value but giving value. Strange-speak nevertheless, when family relationships take on business jargon. :wink:


That's an interesting point. Collocations have context, just as individual vocabulary words do.

She - the speaker of this sentence - might have heard "give value" in business. She works for Krups in the states and her first language is German.

:idea: :shock: :)
 
C

CitySpeak

Guest
jwschang said:
CitySpeak said:
RonBee said:
CitySpeak said:
Red5 said:
One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

Read more...
Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language

I heard someone say "They give a lot of value to their families."
Isn't "They place a lot of value on their families." more like how it would normally be said?
I think so.
give value to - or - place value on
Yes, it should be place a lot of value on. I don't think the first one is even an English sentence.

That sentence was spoken by a German speaker. It is a grammatically correct sentence. Collocationally, it is wrong.

It sounds like suits-talk. Give value to your shareholders, give value to the meeting, add value to this and that....
I think the speaker perhaps didn't mean placing value but giving value. Strange-speak nevertheless, when family relationships take on business jargon. :wink:


That's an interesting point. Collocations have context, just as individual vocabulary words do.

She - the speaker of this sentence - might have heard "give value" in business. She works for Krups in the states and her first language is German.

:idea: :shock: :)
 
C

CitySpeak

Guest
jwschang said:
CitySpeak said:
RonBee said:
CitySpeak said:
Red5 said:
One element of improving your vocabulary is learning which verbs go with which nouns - also called collocations. For example: Do you make or do a mess? Does he miss or lose an opportunity? Here is a series of collocation...

Read more...
Source: English as 2nd Language
English as 2nd Language

I heard someone say "They give a lot of value to their families."
Isn't "They place a lot of value on their families." more like how it would normally be said?
I think so.
give value to - or - place value on
Yes, it should be place a lot of value on. I don't think the first one is even an English sentence.

That sentence was spoken by a German speaker. It is a grammatically correct sentence. Collocationally, it is wrong.

It sounds like suits-talk. Give value to your shareholders, give value to the meeting, add value to this and that....
I think the speaker perhaps didn't mean placing value but giving value. Strange-speak nevertheless, when family relationships take on business jargon. :wink:


That's an interesting point. Collocations have context, just as individual vocabulary words do.

She - the speaker of this sentence - might have heard "give value" in business. She works for Krups in the states and her first language is German.

:idea: :shock: :)
 
J

jwschang

Guest
CitySpeak said:
That's an interesting point. Collocations have context, just as individual vocabulary words do.
She - the speaker of this sentence - might have heard "give value" in business. She works for Krups in the states and her first language is German.
:idea: :shock: :)

Wonder if it could be Krups' company policy to give value all around, consumers, shareholders, families, but grammar not included. :lol:
 
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