Commas

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jack

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After she moved to the coast she discovered that she liked the rain; she forgot her earlier dislike of wet pavement and often went for long walks on rainy days. <--why isn't there a comma between "she" and "discovered"?

After shmoved to the coast, she discovered that the ocean is endlessly fascinating. <--this one have a comma?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
After she moved to the coast she discovered that she liked the rain; she forgot her earlier dislike of wet pavement and often went for long walks on rainy days. <--why isn't there a comma between "she" and "discovered"?

After shmoved to the coast, she discovered that the ocean is endlessly fascinating. <--this one have a comma?

I think you mean "between coast and she". I would place a comma there. It is common to do that after an opening adverbial clause. :wink:
 

jack

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ok, thanks.

I was studying this book and they did not have a comma. I was wondering if it was error.
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
ok, thanks.

I was studying this book and they did not have a comma. I was wondering if it was error.

There is a general tendency to reduce comma usage when they are not necessary. I would call this an error, however. 8)
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
why is it an error? Why is this rhetorical? How can i tell?

Punctuation rules vary from source to source more than grammar rules. Some comma placements are more obligatory than others. This one is of medium importance, in my opinion. :wink:
 

Tdol

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I'd put the comma in too. ;-)
 

jack

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"I like the colour Blue," she said. <--why is there a comma after blue? why isn't it a period? how do you know?
 

Tdol

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The 'seh said' is also part of the sentence. What she said is grammatically a sentence, but you also want to include the rest. If not, speech would become very choppy. ;-)
 

jack

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"I like the colour Blue because it is my favorite colour." she said. <--is the period correct? if i use a comma, it is incorrect right?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
"I like the colour Blue because it is my favorite colour." she said. <--is the period correct? if i use a comma, it is incorrect right?

The period is not correct there. It should be a comma. The quoted statement ends with "color", but the sentence does not. :wink:
 

jack

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"The period is not correct there. It should be a comma. The quoted statement ends with "color", but the sentence does not" <---i dont get this. can you explain this in another way?
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
"The period is not correct there. It should be a comma. The quoted statement ends with "color", but the sentence does not" <---i dont get this. can you explain this in another way?

It meant that the quoted ended with the word "color", but the sentence didn't end until the word "said". That is why the period goes after "said".
 

jack

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"He had done all his work since his failure last term threatened his final grade." <--what does this mean when there is no comma between work and since?

"He had done all his work, since his failure last term threatened his final grade." <--what does this mean when there is a comma between work and since?
 

Francois

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He had done all his work since his failure last term threatened his final grade
From the moment he failed last term up to now, he had done all his work. (range of time)

He had done all his work, since his failure last term threatened his final grade
he had done all his work because his failure last term threatened his final grade. (causality)

FRC
 
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