Common Legal phrase used when asking a question

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It is common use during legal interviews for questions to be prefaced with the phrase, "Is it not true" (that you were there at that time). Shouldn't it be stated as, "Is it true" (that you were there at that time). A recent congressional inquiry reminded me of how frequently this term "Is it not true" is used. Isn't this bad grammar and unnecessarily confusing what could otherwise be a straightforward question?
 

RonBee

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No, it's not bad grammar. And it isn't confusing.
Q: Is it not true that you were there at the time?
A: No, it is true. I was there.
:)
 

Tdol

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It's often not meant as a straightforward question butused to put pressure on someone and force them to confirm something they may not wish to be known.
 
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