Complete sentence

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bmo

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Is the following a complete sentence?

Calling me names before you quit?

Thanks. BMO
 

MikeNewYork

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bmo said:
Is the following a complete sentence?

Calling me names before you quit?

Thanks. BMO

It is not a complete sentence; it is missing "Are you" at the beginning.
 

bmo

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Someone told me "Calling me names?" without "Are you" in front of it, could have an "Implied subject or verb."

This means "Calling me names" alone might be okay as it is, and is equivalent to "Are you calling me names" or "You are calling me names." If this is the case and is acceptable, would you please elaborate on "implied noun" or implied verb?"

Thanks.

BMO
 

MikeNewYork

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bmo said:
Someone told me "Calling me names?" without "Are you" in front of it, could have an "Implied subject or verb."

This means "Calling me names" alone might be okay as it is, and is equivalent to "Are you calling me names" or "You are calling me names." If this is the case and is acceptable, would you please elaborate on "implied noun" or implied verb?"

Thanks.

BMO

Certainly the question mark after "calling me names" makes it a question and implies "are you". That does not, however, make it a complete sentence. We use sentence fragments often in speech and sometimes in writing. They serve a purpose, but are not grammatical.
 

MikeNewYork

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MikeNewYork

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Android said:
And that is called ellision - missing the words out. :)

One L in elision, please. :wink:
 
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