comprehension and grammar

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jiang

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Dear teachers,

I have five questions to ask.

No.1
In a year when public concern over violence tops the opinion surveys, the feds are trying all three, but the impact is problematic.
I consulted the word 'fed' in the dictionary 'fed' is the short term for 'federation' . Since the context is U.S.A it should refer to the federal government. My question is why 'feds'?

No.2 Please read the following paragraph ( this is in the same passage as the above one)

Fierce debate over funding lies ahead. The Senate has passed a bill that would cost taxpayers more than $22 billion over five years, and the National Council on Crime and delinquency says it eventually could run $351 billion more, mostly for prison expansion. Even more lockups would be needed for providing life terms for criminals convicted three times of violent acts. The Clinton administration rejected arguments that such measures would lead to prisons for the aged and urged Congress to pass a carefully drawn "three strikes" measure to "send a strong message".

Question No.1: 'life terms' is opposite to 'death term'. But what that have to do with 'three times of violent acts' ? I don't think it makes sense to say 'if a person commits crimes three times he won't be sentenced to death but the police have to put him to lockup' because what about murder? He will certainly be sentenced to death even once.

Question No.2: 'such meansures would lead to prisons for the aged'. Why the aged? I don't think aged people are sure to commit a crime.

Question No.3: What's this 'three strikes' measure? I guess it's more of a cultural question than a comhension one.

Question No.4: 'send a strong message' . Does it mean a regulation that
would frighten criminals?

I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Thank you in advance.

Jiang
 

RonBee

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jiang said:
Dear teachers,

I have five questions to ask.

No.1
In a year when public concern over violence tops the opinion surveys, the feds are trying all three, but the impact is problematic.
I consulted the word 'fed' in the dictionary 'fed' is the short term for 'federation' . Since the context is U.S.A it should refer to the federal government. My question is why 'feds'?

It's plural. One could say it is short for "federal authorities". (The singular "fed" is short for "Federal Reserve".)

jiang said:
No.2 Please read the following paragraph ( this is in the same passage as the above one)

Fierce debate over funding lies ahead. The Senate has passed a bill that would cost taxpayers more than $22 billion over five years, and the National Council on Crime and delinquency says it eventually could run $351 billion more, mostly for prison expansion. Even more lockups would be needed for providing life terms for criminals convicted three times of violent acts. The Clinton administration rejected arguments that such measures would lead to prisons for the aged and urged Congress to pass a carefully drawn "three strikes" measure to "send a strong message".

Question No.1: 'life terms' is opposite to 'death term'. But what that have to do with 'three times of violent acts' ? I don't think it makes sense to say 'if a person commits crimes three times he won't be sentenced to death but the police have to put him to lockup' because what about murder? He will certainly be sentenced to death even once.

Question No.2: 'such meansures would lead to prisons for the aged'. Why the aged? I don't think aged people are sure to commit a crime.

Question No.3: What's this 'three strikes' measure? I guess it's more of a cultural question than a comhension one.

Question No.4: 'send a strong message' . Does it mean a regulation that
would frighten criminals?

I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Question No.1:
  • Actually, there is no such thing as a death term. The term is death sentence.

    The entire phrase is life terms for criminals convicted three times of violent acts. Those criminals have been sentenced to life in prison for committing three violent criminal acts.

    Certainly, a death sentence "trumps" (takes precedence over) a life sentence.

Question No.2
  • The comment about prisons for the aged means that if you sentence someone to life without parole he is likely to grow old in prison.

Question No.3:
  • "Three strikes" refers to three crimes. In the game of baseball if a batter makes three strikes he is out. That is the analogy being made here: three strikes and you are out.

Question No.4:
  • Yes. It is intended to frighten criminals into making them behave.

:)
 

jiang

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Joined
Nov 18, 2003
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
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China
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:D
Dear RonBee,

Glad to hear from you again!

Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand them perfecly.

Jiang

jiang said:
Dear teachers,

I have five questions to ask.

No.1
In a year when public concern over violence tops the opinion surveys, the feds are trying all three, but the impact is problematic.
I consulted the word 'fed' in the dictionary 'fed' is the short term for 'federation' . Since the context is U.S.A it should refer to the federal government. My question is why 'feds'?

No.2 Please read the following paragraph ( this is in the same passage as the above one)

Fierce debate over funding lies ahead. The Senate has passed a bill that would cost taxpayers more than $22 billion over five years, and the National Council on Crime and delinquency says it eventually could run $351 billion more, mostly for prison expansion. Even more lockups would be needed for providing life terms for criminals convicted three times of violent acts. The Clinton administration rejected arguments that such measures would lead to prisons for the aged and urged Congress to pass a carefully drawn "three strikes" measure to "send a strong message".

Question No.1: 'life terms' is opposite to 'death term'. But what that have to do with 'three times of violent acts' ? I don't think it makes sense to say 'if a person commits crimes three times he won't be sentenced to death but the police have to put him to lockup' because what about murder? He will certainly be sentenced to death even once.

Question No.2: 'such meansures would lead to prisons for the aged'. Why the aged? I don't think aged people are sure to commit a crime.

Question No.3: What's this 'three strikes' measure? I guess it's more of a cultural question than a comhension one.

Question No.4: 'send a strong message' . Does it mean a regulation that
would frighten criminals?

I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Thank you in advance.

Jiang
 

RonBee

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Joined
Feb 9, 2003
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Other
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You're quite welcome.

:D
 
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