conditional doubts

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Hi there,

I've studied four conditionals( 0,1,2,3) and know their structures but then I read a sentence in a test:" We have to check out soon if we're going to catch our plane". I'm a bit confused because I didn't recognise its structure, I thought it was a conditional, was it? if not, could you please tell me what it is? and where should I use this structure?
Thank you so much,:roll:
 

fantasydew

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Hi there,

I've studied four conditionals( 0,1,2,3) and know their structures but then I read a sentence in a test:" We have to check out soon if we're going to catch our plane". I'm a bit confused because I didn't recognise its structure, I thought it was a conditional, was it? if not, could you please tell me what it is? and where should I use this structure?
Thank you so much,:roll:

Hello,

This sentece is a "Direct Object Clause".
Replace "We have to check out soon if we are going to catch our plane" with one word, let's say "the timetable" and you will get " We have to check out soon the timetable".
The timetable is the Direct Object of the verb" To check out".
What do we have to check out? The timetable or, in the case of your sentence, If we are going to catch our plane.
You cannot use "on what condition do we have to check out soon?" it doesn't make sense.

So, your sentence is not a Conditional Sentence.

I have another example for you:
We asked him whether / if he had understood the instructions.
What did we ask him? Whether / if he had understood the instructions.

hope that helps!:)
 
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I think check out hasn't got the meaning you mention.
 

beascarpetta

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maybe this will help
be sure to scroll down to where it says first conditional

it looks like a case of mixed conditionals to me.
hope this helps :-D
 

David L.

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We have to check out soon if we're going to catch our plane".

As I see it, the grammar is wrong. It should be:
"We'll have to check out soon if we're going to catch our plane"
without the contractions:
We will have to check out soon if we are going to catch our plane"

He: We need to check out early.
She: But check-out isn't until 11 am
He : We'll have to check out earlier than that if we are going to be in time to catch our plane.
or We will have to check out soon if we are going to catch our plane.
In effect, the condition is: If you want to be sure you will catch your plane, you will need to check out sooner than usual. If you have to, (and are going to_ check out at the usual check out time, then no condition comes into it - We have to check out soon. Full stop. You have to check out because of hotel policy, nothing to do with flight schedules.
BUT : IF (conditional tense introduced) you want to do this, then you will have to do that.
 
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riverkid

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Hi there,

I've studied four conditionals( 0,1,2,3) and know their structures but then I read a sentence in a test:" We have to check out soon if we're going to catch our plane". I'm a bit confused because I didn't recognise its structure, I thought it was a conditional, was it? if not, could you please tell me what it is? and where should I use this structure?
Thank you so much,:roll:

I can't understand the problem you're having, Carla. It certainly is a conditional.

"We have to check out soon if we're going to catch our plane"

[= in meaning]

If we don't leave the hotel soon, then the consequence/result will be that we will miss our plane.

OR

Unless we meet the condition of leaving this hotel room soon, we will miss our plane.
 

riverkid

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We have to check out soon if we're going to catch our plane".

As I see it, the grammar is wrong. It should be:
"We'll have to check out soon if we're going to catch our plane"
without the contractions:
We will have to check out soon if we are going to catch our plane"

David, I don't see how 'have to' requires 'will' to make it grammatical.
 
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Riverkid, I studied the conditionals and their structures, I've learned that the zero takes present+present, the first takes (if) present+will, the third past+would and the fourth past perfect+would present perfect and then nobody else taught me that I could use are going to+(verb) instead of will as it was mentioned by that person from UK. So can I do that?:shock:
 
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Riverkid, I studied the conditionals and their structures, I've learned that the zero takes present+present, the first takes (if) present+will, the third past+would and the fourth past perfect+would present perfect and then nobody else taught me that I could use are going to+(verb) instead of will as it was mentioned by David from UK. So can I do that?:shock:
I didn't know that. Thanks for the help.
 

riverkid

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Riverkid, I studied the conditionals and their structures, I've learned that the zero takes present+present, the first takes (if) present+will, the third past+would and the fourth past perfect+would present perfect and then nobody else taught me that I could use are going to+(verb) instead of will as it was mentioned by that person from UK. So can I do that?:shock:


Hi Carla.

Sure you can do that.

Why not try to create some more examples to see if you can use it in your own life? When you can use a structure to talk about your own life then you really understand how it's used.

Here are some other potential uses:

We have to check out soon if we intend to catch our plane.

We have to check out soon if we want to catch our plane.

We have to check out soon if we plan on catching our plane.
 
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Hi Riverkid, now I am really lost, because I was taught not to use will in the if clause(in the first conditional).:shock: where could I find some more information about this?:shock::shock::shock:Thanks so so muuchh
 

riverkid

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Hi Riverkid, now I am really lost, because I was taught not to use will in the if clause(in the first conditional).:shock: where could I find some more information about this?:shock::shock::shock:Thanks so so muuchh

Take a breath, Carla, a deep breath. There, feel better, now. We can fix this thing you know. Just hang in there.

A great deal of your trouble here is that you seem wedded to these numbered conditionals. They do not represent all of the possibilities that are present in English and if you hold tight to these patterns without letting your mind see the meanings then you're always going to be confused.

Generally, we do not use 'will' in the 'if' clause but it's not because some grammar rules tell us we can't, it's because of meaning. When we DO use 'will' in the if/when clause, it holds another meaning. That's why we don't normally use it.

1a. When you go to the store, ...

1b.. When you [finally] will go to the store, ...

2a. If you go to the store ...

2b. If you will go to the store ...

In 1b and 2b, 'will' holds a different meaning of 'will', this one of 'willingness', as in,

When you're willing to go to the store, ...

If you're willing to go to the store, ...

Don't make the mistake of locking yourself into what are at best, rough guidelines for language. The first/second/third conditionals change form when we want to express certain meanings. They do not and can not describe all the potential uses of conditionals.
 
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Hi Riverkid,
I can not say how much thankful Iam, I really appreciate that, Thank you very much.:roll:
 
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Hi Riverkid,
I can not say how much thankful Iam, I really appreciate that, Thank you very much.:roll:
and I would love to know how to espress these "certain meanings "you've talked about.
Have a nice day Riverkid, It has been very nice talking to you:lol:
 
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