"Contribution" vs Contribution

Tan Elaine

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1. Contribution is either a countable or uncountable noun.

2. "Contribution" is either a countable or uncountable noun.

The above are my sentences.

Which is the correct sentence, the one with quotation marks or the one without? I sometimes notice the absence of quotation marks in such constructions and wonder if this is the latest trend.

Thanks.
 
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Matthew Wai

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1. The noun 'contribution' can be countable or uncountable.
2. 'Contribution' can be countable or uncountable.
 

Tan Elaine

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1. The noun 'contribution' can be countable or uncountable.
2. 'Contribution' can be countable or uncountable.
Thanks, Matthew.

1. Contribution can be a countable or uncountable noun.

2. "Contribution" can be a countable or uncountable noun.

My question is if Contribution need not be enclosed by quotation marks. I have seen constructions without quotation marks and wonder if this is the latest trend.
 
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Matthew Wai

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Some members use italics instead of quotation marks, but I always use the latter.
 

Tan Elaine

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Some members use italics instead of quotation marks, but I always use the latter.
That means if Contribution is not enclosed by quotation marks, or italicised, such a construction is incorrect. In other words, it is not the latest trend to leave out quotation marks from such contructions. Did I get what you were driving at?

Thanks again, Matthew.
 

Matthew Wai

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See what a teacher said below.

It's rather a pity that the writer of that did not put quotation marks around those words, or italicise them. Words discussed should be distinguished in some way from the words used to discuss them.
 

jutfrank

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It's certainly not "the latest trend".
 
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