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Hi there,

The apartment is at 200 dollars per night.
Is it Ok to say like this?

Thanks
pete
 

David L.

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The apartment is 200 dollars a night.

is the way a check-in desk receptionist would say this.

If you were renting a flat or an apartment long term, the person letting the flat might say:
The flat is $1000 per month
and when telling a friend, you might say
The flat is $1000 a month
or
The flat is going for $1000 a month.
 
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albertino

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The apartment is 200 dollars a night.

is the way a check-in desk receptionist would say this.

If you were renting a flat or an apartment long term, the person letting the flat might say:
The flat is $1000 per month
and when telling a friend, you might say
The flat is $1000 a month
or
The flat is going for $1000 a month.
Sorry to intervene.
May I say "The flat is for rent at $1,000 per month" or
"The flat is going for sale at 100,000 pounds"?
 

David L.

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May I say:
"The flat is for rent at $1,000 per month"

Yes - this is what the real estate agent, or the landlord himself, would say to a potential tenant.

"The flat is going for sale at 100,000 pounds"?
Not quite. The possibilities are:
The flat is up for sale at ...
The flat is going for ... (here, the two people have been talking about buying some property, and so it would be understood he is talking about buying. not renting.)
 

peter123

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hi there,

Is it correct?

How much is the rent of the apartment?

Thanks
pete
 

Offroad

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[NOT A TEACHER]

Sounds OK to me.

Thumbs up to you Peter.
 

David L.

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Your sentence should be :

How much is the rent for the apartment?

'rent of' is used in a sentence like:

"Is electricity included in the rent of this room?"
 

Offroad

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Thanks David, I saw that written somewhere.
It can be wrong, but people talk or write like that.

search the web for "How much is the rent of"
 

David L.

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The other place to be wary if you are learning English is listening to that spoken in American reality shows, (particularly the tenses) eg

I had came
I had went
 

Offroad

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Well, I am just a learner trying to get some English, no matter what English. However, in my view, the British English is politer, more beautiful, reminds me of that castles from middle age. The Shakespeare's language. On the other hand, the American English is "faster", maybe bad-spelled as many BRits say, but it's quite usual and stronger than any other language in the world. The business language.
 

David L.

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Can you give me examples of the kind of differences you mean? eg
Stronger?
Faster?
 

Offroad

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I am talkin about money, David.

Everyone know how strong and fast the American English is, it's everywhere.

People don't care if you say 'gimme more', 'stop talkin', instead of 'give me more', 'stop talking'. People care about money.
Formalism will never "beat" the money.
 
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