Could I trouble you solving two questions?

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sky753

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Hi everone ,
1.That is _____ for you to understand. A.easy enough book B.an easy book enough C.a book easy enough D.an enough easy book
2.It ______ that he will not be able to solve the problem without help.
A.looks B.looks as if C.appeared D.seems
Thank you
Weiqun
 

Casiopea

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weiqun ding said:
Hi everyone ,
1.That is _____ for you to understand. A. easy enough book B.an easy book enough C. a book easy enough D.an enough easy book
2.It ______ that he will not be able to solve the problem without help.
A.looks B.looks as if C.appeared D.seems

Hello.

Try, Could I trouble you to solve two questions (for me)?

1. That is ________________for you to understand.
D. is incorrect. It should be 'an easy enough book'.
C. is incorrect. It should be 'an easy enough book'
B. is correct.
A. is incorrect. It should be 'an easy enough book'

Note,
It should be an easy book. (adjective)
It should be an easy enough book. (adverb post-modifying 'easy')

2. It ______that he will not be able to solve the problem without help.
A. is incorrect. Try, It looks as if he will not...
B. is incorrect. 'if' and 'that' are near synonyms; use one or the other.
C is incorrect. 'appeared' is past tense; Try, present tense 'appears'
D. is correct.

On a final note, what's with all the SHOUTING below? :shock:

weiqun ding said:
HELLO EVERYONE,
I AM AN ESL TEACHER OF A VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL. DRUING MY TEACHING AND STUDYING. I HAVE MET A LOT OF PROBLEMS IN ENGLISH LEANING. FOR EXAMPLE ,THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "HOW I S EVERYTHING WITH YOU?"AND "HOW ARE THINGS".THE USAGE OF SUCH SIMILAR SENTENCES OFTEN CONFUSES ME AND MY STUDENTS.
AND I AM WONDERING WHETHER YOU COULD HELP ME .THANK YOU ALL
WEIQUN DING
SEP.14 2004.

Try,

I'm an ESL teacher at a vocational high school and when I'm teaching English and even when I am studying English on my own, I come across a lot of problems, for example the difference between the usage of similar greetings such as "How is everything with you?" and "How are things?", which often confuse me and my students. Could you help? Thank you.

In response, "How are things (with you)?" and "How is everything with you?" mean the same thing, so don't let them confuse you or your students anymore:

How's everything? (How's this, that, and everything else?)
How are things? (How's this, that, and everything else?)

The grammar is different (i.e., is/are) because the words they agree with are different. Singular 'is' agrees with singular 'everything' and plural 'are' agrees with plural 'things'.

everything has a synonym: all things. If we delete "all", we are left with plural "things".

Input: How is everything?
Choice #1
Change 'everything' and Contract: How's things? (OK; informal)
Choice #2
Change 'is' to 'are': How are things? (OK)
Output: How are things?

So you see, "How are things?" is short for "How is everything?" They mean the same thing. 8)
 

sky753

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Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
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China
Current Location
China
Hi Casiopea,
I appreciate your giving me the answers and pointing out my mistakes. I hope I can master as much English as you do.
There is another question I can not work out.
Give this to______ you think can do the work well.
A.who B.Whoever CWhomever D.Whatever
Thank you!
 

Casiopea

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weiqun ding said:
Hi Casiopea,
I appreciate your giving me the answers and pointing out my mistakes. I hope I can master as much English as you do.
There is another question I can not work out.
Give this to______ you think can do the work well.
A. who B.Whoever CWhomever D.Whatever
Thank you!

And I'd appreciate you taking a look at my suggestion. :wink: Your signature is still SCREAMING. :shock:

'to' is a preposition, so it's object should be 'whom':

Give this to whomever you

These days speakers tend to drop/omit '-m':

Give this to whoever you (informal)

You can add 'that' if its reference is generic:

Give this to the person that you

Others:

Give this to the person whom you
Give this to the person who you (informal)

Give this to whatever you (Not OK, 'whatever' is not compatible with 'you'.
 
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