Could it be misinterpreted?

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Joe

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Dec 31, 2003
They gossip about romances in the class.

I think the blue part may cause confusion. It could be interpreted as:

They gossip about romances. And they do that when they are having classes.

Or:

They gossip about the romances, which involve their classmates. ("in the class" serves to modifies "romances")

Am I making any sense here? If it does cause misunderstanding, how to make it right? Thanks. :)
 

Casiopea

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Joe said:
They gossip about romances in the class.

I think the blue part may cause confusion. It could be interpreted as:

They gossip about romances. And they do that when they are having classes.

Or:

They gossip about the romances, which involve their classmates. ("in the class" serves to modifies "romances")

Am I making any sense here? If it does cause misunderstanding, how to make it right? Thanks. :)

It's not ambiguous, just odd. Try,

They gossip about romances in class. (OK)

Ambiguous
They gossip about romances in the classes. (OK)

1. in the classes of society.
2. in the classes they take.

All the best, :D
 

Joe

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Dec 31, 2003
Thanks, Cas. I don't quite understand "society" here. Could you explain "in the classes of society" somewhat? Maybe you give me some examples using "society". :)
 

Casiopea

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Joe said:
Thanks, Cas. I don't quite understand "society" here. Could you explain "in the classes of society" somewhat? Maybe you give me some examples using "society". :)

Classes of society (based on economic status)
lower class
lower-middle class
middle class
upper-middle class
upper class

:D
 

Joe

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Joined
Dec 31, 2003
Casiopea said:
Classes of society (based on economic status)
lower class
lower-middle class
middle class
upper-middle class
upper class
:D

Oh, I see. Does "They gossip about romances in class" suggest that "they talk about romances during their class time"?
 

Casiopea

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Joe said:
Casiopea said:
Classes of society (based on economic status)
lower class
lower-middle class
middle class
upper-middle class
upper class
:D

Oh, I see. Does "They gossip about romances in class" suggest that "they talk about romances during their class time"?

Yes. :D While they are in the classroom and supposed to be studying, they are talking about romances, either their own romances, someone else's romances or romance novels, movies, TV shows. :D
 
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