Defining the terms of an equation

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Offroad

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Dear teachers,

Is this the best way to describe the terms of an equation?

Professsor Einstein showed that energy is proportional to mass with this equation:

E = m*c^2

where(in):
E=energy;
m=mass;
c=speed of light
;

It seems to me that 'wherein' fits better considering the nature of the context.

Thank you

Offroad
 

Route21

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As an NES but not a teacher, I would normally use "where" in such cases, but "wherein" or "in which" would probably also work for me.

Regards
R21
 

SoothingDave

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"Wherein" is the type of word found in legal documents and not in common use.
 

emsr2d2

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I'd use "where" too.

Where x equals 10 and b equals 4, you'll find that x and y together give you 14.

There you go, equations for beginners. To clarify, I got the lowest pass mark possible in my only maths exam, at the age of 16.
 
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