degree/level

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angliholic

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As to the degree/level of the impact, no one has really come up with an absolute answer so far.


Hi,
Do both degree and level fit in the above and mean about the same to you? Thanks.
 

Neillythere

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As to the degree/level of the impact, no one has really come up with an absolute answer so far.


As a Brit, but not a teacher, I would offer the following definitions from the Free Online Dictionary:

degree - definition of degree by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
4. Relative intensity or amount, as of a quality or attribute: a high degree of accuracy.


level - definition of level by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
b. A relative degree, as of achievement, intensity, or concentration: an unsafe level of toxicity; a high level of frustration.


On this basis, you may regard them as equivalent.

The only extra comment I would make, however, would be that you could have, say, severe burns over a small area or less severe burns over a much larger area.

Your sentence tends to suggest whichever way you look at it, no one has come up with an answer.

Hope this helps.

Regards
 
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