dehumidifier

Status
Not open for further replies.

peter123

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Malaysia
Current Location
Hong Kong
Hi there,

Any slang or informal word for 'dehumidifier' in Britain, North America??

Thanks
pete
 

banderas

Key Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2008
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Polish
Home Country
Poland
Current Location
UK
Hi there,

Any slang or informal word for 'dehumidifier' in Britain, North America??

Thanks
pete

DH but it is rather specialised and not very common;-)
 

vil

Key Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Bulgarian
Home Country
Bulgaria
Current Location
Bulgaria
Hi peter123,

dehumitify (v) = to remove atmospheric moisture from.

dehumidifier (n) = any device or apparatus for removing moisture from air.

drier (dryer) - convection drier - stationary drier - drying chamber

Regards.

V.
 
Last edited:

Anglika

No Longer With Us
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Member Type
Other
Hi peter123,

dehumitify (v) = to remove atmospheric moisture from.

dehumidifier (n) = any device or apparatus for removing moisture from air.

Regards.

V.

Hi, vil, I think Peter knows this - he was curious to find out if there is a slang term for them in the US or Britain.

In the UK none so far, though if we go on having floods in our houses one might appear.
 

Offroad

Key Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Brazilian Portuguese
Home Country
Brazil
Current Location
Brazil
I guess people in everyday conversation usually say:

We need a new dryer.

Students and professionals, technicians, especially of Engineering, usually say:

This dryer/dehumidifier is not working properly, we need to find out what is going on with it, maybe the A valve is broken, it always has been out of order.
 

Ouisch

Key Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
In AmE, it's strictly called a "dehumidifier." ("Dryer" is used to describe an automatic clothes dryer.)
 

Anglika

No Longer With Us
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Member Type
Other
Same here - a dryer uses heat to dry clothes, where a dehumidifier extracts moisture from the air.
 

Offroad

Key Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Brazilian Portuguese
Home Country
Brazil
Current Location
Brazil
I'd say that a dehumidifier is a dryer, by the way, there are many kinds of dryers, many kinds of foods, soaps, medicines, chemicals are obtained from specific dryers, and of course, there are clothes dryers, dehumidifiers, etc.

In Brazil, people call it simply a dryer, no matter what it does.
 
Last edited:

peter123

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Malaysia
Current Location
Hong Kong
Hi there,

Look for answers ONLY from native English speakers.


Would there be a short term for 'dehumidifier' in conversation? It seems that 'dehumidifier' is a bit long?


Thanks
pete
 

stuartnz

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
New Zealand
Current Location
New Zealand
I'm not a teacher, but I am a native speaker, and like the other native speakers, I do not know of a contraction of "dehumidifier" or a slang term for it. Native speakers don't appear to have an issue with the word, and I cannot see an easy way to shorten the word while retaining its meaning. This is especially true since you can also buy "humidifiers" which have the opposite purpose and function.
 

Anglika

No Longer With Us
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Member Type
Other
I'd say that a dehumidifier is a dryer, by the way, there are many kinds of dryers, many kinds of foods, soaps, medicines, chemicals are obtained from specific dryers, and of course, there are clothes dryers, dehumidifiers, etc.

In Brazil, people call it simply a dryer, no matter what it does.

There is a difference.

A dehumidifier does not dry things - it removes moisture from the atmosphere to a required level.
 

Offroad

Key Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Brazilian Portuguese
Home Country
Brazil
Current Location
Brazil
Anglika, a dehumidifier dryes clothes, paper, plates, food. It's a equipment or aparatus that is used to dry air and things, its objective is to remove the moisture from something. To dry things, obviously, the thing has to be inside the dryer, or if you prefer, dehumidifier.
A dehumidifier can works on a nitrogen/argon atmosphere as well, some materials shouldn't be dryed in an air atmosphere.
 
Last edited:

Anglika

No Longer With Us
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Member Type
Other
That may be how you call them, but nevertheless in English there is a difference.

The requirement for de-humidification is to reduce the moisture in the air to an optimum level, not to remove all moisture. It operates by drawing the air across refrigerated coils on which the moisture condenses to be drained into a reservoir.

A dryer for clothes, dishes and other household items removes all or as much moisture as is possible, and will do it by applying heat, the moisture dispersing as steam.
 

Offroad

Key Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Brazilian Portuguese
Home Country
Brazil
Current Location
Brazil
Actually, Anglika, there's no difference, people say that in English as well. But I think you're right, however, this is like that discussion about what people say uncounsciously.

All in all, you're right, because people have learned like you just said and noone cares about technical terms or something like that.
 
Last edited:

stuartnz

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
New Zealand
Current Location
New Zealand
I'm with marcio on this one, and so's the OED:
dehu
sm.gif
midify
, v
spacer.gif


trans. To reduce the degree of humidity of; to remove moisture from; to dry. So
smm.gif
dehumidifi
sm.gif
cation
, the removal of moisture;




There is nothing intrinsic to the word that precludes the removal of ALL moisture, nor is there anything which stipulates the medium from which the moisture is to be removed. and to quote Anglika's words, it is also easy to envisage scenarios in which "to reduce the moisture... to an optimum level" would mean reaching an optimum level that happens to be zero. Of course, the most common use, and the only one I'd heard of before today, was the one that describes the sort of appliance sitting 2 metres to my left, the common air dehumidifier Anglika was describing.

Thanks, marciobarbalho, for introducing me to a sort of dehumidifier I'd never heard of before!:-D
 

NearThere

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Taiwan
Current Location
United States
Stuartz,

You're kidding right?
 

stuartnz

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
New Zealand
Current Location
New Zealand
Stuartz,

You're kidding right?


Kidding about what? Marcio's correct that the word itself does not intrinsically mean, "reduce the amount of moisture in air to a level considered optimum but greater than zero". As the OED says, the word's bald, usage-free definition is simply "remove moisture from", with no limitations on how much moisture is to be removed, or from what.

As to my thanking him, that too was genuine. To discover that in engineering argot a dehumidifier is something quite different to the one in my office, was interesting and enjoyable. Just as it was when I first heard astronauts talking about how they "translate" along the ISS's central structure during spacewalks. That was a meaning of "translate" I had not previously been aware of, and learning it fascinated me. Likewise with dehumidifier.
 
Last edited:

NearThere

Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Taiwan
Current Location
United States
Alright, I'd be honest. I'm not a debator, unfortunately horribly lousy in spelling. But I'll try my best.

It just seems by thanking him (not that there's anything wrong by being nice) you validated his interpretation of "dehumilifier" as "dryer" which to me up till the very last minute he still belived that it was a "dryer" no matter what kind, and that, in my humble opinion, could be a little misleading to him. Don't you think it should be the formost priority to clarify that as best you can for his benifit as well as others? And common sense told me that peter may very well mean "dehumilifier" rather than a "dryer", if he knows the word "dehumilifier" my guts tells me he knows the word "dryer" before this day too.

I'm sorry, if I read anything in this thread wrong. I'd whole heartedly apoligize if I misinterpreted any part or the point of the discussion. I'm really open for enlightenment. Thanks.

NT
 

stuartnz

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
New Zealand
Current Location
New Zealand
Alright, I'd be honest. I'm not a debator, unfortunately horribly lousy in spelling. But I'll try my best.

It just seems by thanking him (not that there's anything wrong by being nice) you validated his interpretation of "dehumilifier" as "dryer" which to me up till the very last minute he still belived that it was a "dryer" no matter what kind, and that, in my humble opinion, could be a little misleading to him.
NT

Actually, he's right, technically. That's one of the reasons I thanked him. His post made me realise that, technically speaking, anything which dries something dehumidifies it. I learned something from his post, and that's why I thanked him. I also made it very clear that, in my experience the most common use of the word is the one that I had previously thought to be the only use. I was not encouraging the use of "dryer" to mean "dehumidifier". That could lead to a whole new discussion on the danger of using argot definitions of words outside the argot's community, but that's a whole other kettle of fish. Right now, I'm going to translate to the kitchen to pour myself a coke, since my regular, common old dehumidifier is working very well. :)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top