dehumidifier

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NearThere

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Thanks Stuart,

That's fair enough. :-D

Thank you
NT
 

Neillythere

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Hi folks

Sorry to intervene, late on, in this somewhat heated discussion between folks whose separate opinions I have, in my short time on this site grown to respect.

I'm a Brit, with over 40 years experience as a Chemical Engineer in the Oil, Gas & Petrochemical industries.

Setting the academics of the OED (and Brazilian English, as Peter123 requested) aside for one moment:

The distinction that I, as a Brit Engineer, would have drawn between a drier and a dehumidifier is that I would normally expect a dehumidifier to recover the humidity as a liquid, whereas a simple drier would merely drive off the moisture and exhaust it to atmosphere.

Getting back to the original question, I don't believe there is a short form for dehumidifier itself. I am, however, currently resident in the Arabian Gulf and, not very far away from me, I have a device that either cools or dehumidifies the air in the room. It's called an Air Conditioner - and that does have a short form - A/C.

That having been said, I think I'll take StuartNZ's advice and translate myself to the bar, where I'll pick up a cool, refreshing (albeit diet) Pepsi/Coke!

Regards to you both!:):)

peter123

Re: dehumidifier
Hi there,

Look for answers ONLY from native English speakers.


Would there be a short term for 'dehumidifier' in conversation? It seems that 'dehumidifier' is a bit long?


Thanks
pete
 

Offroad

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I'm a Brit, with over 40 years experience as a Chemical Engineer in the Oil, Gas & Petrochemical industries.

The distinction that I, as a Brit Engineer, would have drawn between a drier and a dehumidifier is that I would normally expect a dehumidifier to recover the humidity as a liquid, whereas a simple drier would merely drive off the moisture and exhaust it to atmosphere.
Neillythere,
This question is about a short name for dehumidifier, I say it is dryer, or drier, as you wish. In my view, as I've learned, a dryer is any apparatus or system that is designed to dry something no matter how or what kind of atmosphere and so on, there are many specifications and details that are not important right now. However, people normally distinguish between a home dehumidifier and a dryer used to dry hair or clothes. They don't care about technical terms, there's no need, actually.
Well, I am not a Brit, however, every Chemical Engineer know this, there are many many kinds of dryers, with different goals or objectives. You know this.
 
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Batfink

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Neillythere,
This question is about a short name for dehumidifier, I say it is dryer, or drier, as you wish. In my view, as I've learned, a dryer is any apparatus or system that is designed to dry something no matter how or what kind of atmosphere and so on, there are many specifications and details that are not important right now. However, people normally distinguish between a home dehumidifier and a dryer used to dry hair or clothes. They don't care about technical terms, there's no need, actually.
Well, I am not a Brit, however, every Chemical Engineer know this, there are many many kinds of dryers, with different goals or objectives. You know this.

I agree, and I am sure that those in the industry have a shorter term for the device as they would use the word more frequently that mere laymen like ourselves.

It reminds me of how we use the word "hoover" and not vacuum cleaner. Maybe Neilly can capture the language with a snappy word for the device.
 

Neillythere

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Hi folks

I will repeat the originator's request only this once more.

peter123

Re: dehumidifier
Hi there,

Look for answers ONLY from native English speakers.


Would there be a short term for 'dehumidifier' in conversation? It seems that 'dehumidifier' is a bit long?

Thanks
pete

marciobarbalho: If you can (and are qualified to) answer on the above basis, I recommend that you change your profile.

The short form for a vacuum cleaner is simply a vac:

vac - definition of vac by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.
vac (v
abreve.gif
k)
n. Informal A vacuum cleaner.
 
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Ouisch

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Anglika, a dehumidifier dryes clothes, paper, plates, food. It's a equipment or aparatus that is used to dry air and things, its objective is to remove the moisture from something. To dry things, obviously, the thing has to be inside the dryer, or if you prefer, dehumidifier.
A dehumidifier can works on a nitrogen/argon atmosphere as well, some materials shouldn't be dryed in an air atmosphere.

A device that removes moisture from food is called a dehydrator.

A dehumidifier is designed to remove excess humidity in the air, which not only makes the air more comfortable, it also prevents mold and mildew. Air conditioners automatically act as dehumidifiers.
 

Offroad

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I am not trying to lecture or teach you guys/mates, I just gave my opinion, I don't know how you call a dehumidifier in your countries. However, as a Chemical Engineer I was trying to say to you the real, I mean, the technical definition of a dryer.
And, of course, these terms, as I said before, are not use in everyday conversation.
I am only trying to help.
 
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NearThere

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I am not trying to lecture or teach you guys/mates, I just gave my opinion, I don't know how you call a dehumidifier in your countries. However, as a Chemical Engineer I was trying to say to you the real, I mean, the technical definition of a dryer.
And, of course, these terms, as I said before, are not use in everyday conversation.
I am only trying to help.

I have tried to hold back, but it's hard. And note that I'm not trying to add on to the already heated conversation. But a "dehumidifier" is simply not a "dryer" no matter how you look at it, they are 2 different devices, and I think it's simply human nature to jump in and clarify that misconception, and it has nothing to do with "technical definition" as I'm sure Pete was not here looking for it. He simply wants a slang or shortened word for "dehumidifier".

You know maybe we should all ask Pete what he meant by "dehumidifier". So pete,

The dehumidifier you mentioned, is it some kind of machine that you put clothes into and when you turn it on, it spins like crazy and after 50 minutes, your take your clothes out and they are dry?

NT
 

Ouisch

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Seeing such discord over something as seemingly simple as the definition of a dehumidifier makes me realize why it is so difficult to achieve peace in, say, the Middle East. :-?
 

riverkid

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A dryer for clothes, dishes and other household items removes all or as much moisture as is possible, and will do it by applying heat, the moisture dispersing as steam.

Wouldn't the moisture be dispersed as water vapor? If the temps inside a clothes dryer reached temperatures where the water was dispersed as steam, the clothes would be in jeopardy, would they not?
 

Anglika

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Since the steam is extracted through a vent, no. At least, that's what happens with the clothes-driers around here where the steam is vented into the surrounding area.
 

riverkid

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Since the steam is extracted through a vent, no. At least, that's what happens with the clothes-driers around here where the steam is vented into the surrounding area.

I don't believe that what comes out of a clothes dryer vent can accurately be called 'steam', Anglika, though I suppose colloquially or dialectally, it may well be called that.

OED
steam

• noun
1 the hot vapour into which water is converted when heated, which condenses in the air into a mist of minute water droplets.
 

Anglika

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I think this discussion has reached the point of hot air.:scatter:
 

riverkid

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Odd thing for a moderator/teacher to say.

I guess there actually is a distinction, scientifically. Steam is invisible. But as we all know, "colloquial" rules. Specialized jargon works, in specialized circumstances.
 

stuartnz

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Specialized jargon works, in specialized circumstances.

I think that's what most here have been trying to warn marcio about. Since the original poster asked for a short, colloquial form for "dehumidifer", using "dryer" would definitely not work, since almost no one would think of the two terms as being synonymous, even though they may be so from some technical points of view.
 

Offroad

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That's what I was trying to say, Stuart, every one knows there are many points of views. People say a dehumidifier can't be a dryer and vice-versa. Well, whether one of us start talking about heart condition, everybody will agree with each other, however, there's a scientific point of view.
And... of course, no one has to start using scientific terms from now on in order to communicate accuratelly.
I didn't know any colloquial term for dehumidifier, actually I don't til now, if someone asks me, I'll say... dryer.

One more question, teachers... How do you pronounce dehumidifier? I mean, is the "hu" sound close to "hour" or to "huge"?

Many thanks.
 
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Neillythere

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Me thinks you pronounce it "Dry air"!!!!! :lol::lol::lol:
But then, that's probably just a Brit's dry humour!
 
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