died,dead

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Tdol

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He died yesterday. (verb)
A dead body (adjective)
;-)
 

alan

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Jul 8, 2004
hmm...what the participle form of "die" is died,and i know the past participle form can function as an adjective.
so.... we call a "dead man" or "died man" ?
or both of them are acceptable ?
 

Casiopea

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alan said:
hmm...what the participle form of "die" is died,and i know the past participle form can function as an adjective.
so.... we call a "dead man" or "died man" ?
or both of them are acceptable ?

a dead man (Adjective)
a dying man (Present participle)
He has died (Present Participle)
He had died (Past Participle)
a died man (Past Participle) Not OK
 

alan

Junior Member
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Jul 8, 2004
ohh...thanks !!

ahh..i forget sth that is really important...
die is intransitive verb
sorry for raising such a nonsense question~~
hehe
 

alan

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Jul 8, 2004
i have another question,teacher:
after using whether/if, how to determine when we need to add "or not" after that ?
any examples ?
thanks for answering
 

Casiopea

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alan said:
After using whether/if, how do I determine when to add "or not" after that? Any examples?

You're welcome. :D

Whether you decide to go or decide not to go, I will go. Whether you decide to go or not, I will go.
Whether or not you decide to go, I will go.

writersblock said:
"whether or not" can be a legitimate contraction of "whether it will or will not". Nevertheless, you should avoid the construction, as it is less often used than abused. Source
 

alan

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Jul 8, 2004
how about the sentence as follows :

e.g. I don't know whether she loves he (or not).

can we omit the "or not" ??
 

Casiopea

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alan said:
how about the sentence as follows :

e.g. I don't know whether she loves he (or not).

can we omit the "or not" ??

I don't know whether she loves him or not. (OK)
I don't know whether she loves him. (OK; informal)

whether...or is a set pair. It's called a correlative conjunction. If 'or' is left out, that's OK. Its meaning can be picked up in context.
 
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