[Grammar] directed or moving towards the back

kadioguy

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In the OALD, it says:

[FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]backward
ADJECTIVE[/FONT]
[FONT=Tahoma, Calibri, Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif]directed or moving towards the back
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Why not '[/FONT]directing or moving towards the back'?
Why is '
direct' in the passive voice?
 

GoesStation

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That isn't a passive voice. It's the adjective directed.
 

teechar

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Why not '
directing or moving towards the back'?

I'd like you to do this exercise which might help you with similar analyses in future:
Make the following a complete sentence.
directed or moving towards the back

I'll answer your questions after you've had a try.
 

teechar

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The word backward means somebody or something that is directed or moving towards the back.
That's right.
The reason we cannot use "directing" is because "direct" is a transitive verb, so it would need an object. You can certainly use, e.g., "pointing" instead.
Note that "directed" works because it implies:

The word backward means somebody or something that is directed by someone/something towards the back.
 
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