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RoseSpring

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Are their other formal alternatives for the verb " dismiss"

meaning to fire someone?
 

2010

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Are their other formal alternatives for the verb " dismiss"

meaning to fire someone?

===Not a teacher===

You could use these two formally: discharged, dismissed.

Informal: laid-off, pink-slipped, terminated.
 

RoseSpring

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Thanks indeed.
 

TheParser

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Are their other formal alternatives for the verb " dismiss"

meaning to fire someone?


***** NOT A TEACHER *****

Hello, RoseSpring.

(1) While reading some of the threads, I have noticed that some

people are starting to use the verb "downsize" as a nicer way to say

"dismiss" or "terminate."

(2) As you know, many companies in these hard economic times

have to reduce the number of employees. So the verb: to downsize.

( ??? = bring down the size of the staff)

(3) It hurts when a person has to say, "I was fired/dismissed/terminated/

let go."

(4) Maybe it doesn't hurt so much if one says, "I was downsized."

(5) I do NOT know, but maybe some managers are using this verb

when they have to dismiss an employee.

***** Thank you.
 

TheParser

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Are their other formal alternatives for the verb " dismiss"

meaning to fire someone?

********** NOT A TEACHER **********

Hello, RoseSpring.

(1) I just read something that I have to share with you.

(2) A reporter who works for a very important cable news

organization just wrote something that embarrassed and

angered her company. So the manager dismissed her. He

did not use the words "terminate" or "dismiss." He found a

more beautiful way. He said:

She will be leaving the company.

***** Thank you. :)
 

bertietheblue

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Hello, RoseSpring.

(1) While reading some of the threads, I have noticed that some

people are starting to use the verb "downsize" as a nicer way to say

"dismiss" or "terminate."

I couldn't disagree more. 'Downsizing' is to a company what 'collateral damage' is to the military: a dishonest euphemism cynically employed for PR purposes to avoid any suggestion that there are innocent victims.
 
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