"Divinised"?

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Latoof

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Jun 20, 2004
Hi everybody,
While I was reading I found this word "Divinised", but I could not find its meaning in the dictionary. When I was typing the word's processor showed it to be wrong, although I typed it correctly from the source. I believe it means that when someone was held to be a divine.
What shall it be? What is the correct form of it?
Thanks.
 
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Natalie27

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perhaps the person has been beatified? ( to beatify =proclaim a saint)

that's a term commonly used within the Roman Catholic church and means what I think what you were asking about.:cool: :-D
 

Latoof

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Hi Natallie,
I asked my teacher and he told me that the correct form of it is "divined" and that to be held as a Divine or Deity. I asked a British teacher.
I wonder how do people publish their books with speeling mistakes?:-|
Thanks for your reply.
:up:
 

Tdol

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There are mistakes in books, I'm afraid. ;-)
 

Mister Micawber

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'Deified' = made a god. I believe this is what is meant. 'Divined' = discovered via ESP.
 

Mister Micawber

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What is your question, Latoof?
 

Latoof

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'Deified' = made a god. I believe this is what is meant. 'Divined' = discovered via ESP.
I understood what you meant by 'Deified', but what do you mean by discovered via ESP ?
One more thing is the word "devinised" wrong? Or is it just another form of the word?
I am sorry for being "Stupid", but I am sure you will be patient with my questions.
 

Mister Micawber

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ESP = extrasensory perception.

Both 'devinised' and 'divinised' are highly questionable. 'Divinise' has been coined recently. Googling produces a mere 1970 pages using it, with various meanings of 'mythologize', 'spiritualize', 'deify'; most references appear to be 'New Age' religious sites. I would suggest that you wait for 'divinise' to appear as an entry in a reputable dictionary before you begin using it out of hand.
 
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TheMadBaron

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I concur with Mister Micawber. I think what is intended is 'deified'. To be sure about this, we'd need to know the context in which you found the word. Can you quote the passage?

Divining doesn't necessarily involve ESP. Dousing (for example detecting underground water with crossed branches) is often called 'divining'. To divine is to guess (eg the future), intuit or find something using a method that is not understood by science.

'Divinised' sounds ridiculous to me. Then again, 'burglarized' sounds ridiculous to my English ears, but Americans use it all the time....
:roll:
 
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Latoof

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Jun 20, 2004
Hi,

As you have asked me to quote the sentence where the word "Deivinised" appeared. I will give you the paraphrasing of it as I don't have the origin book. The auther says that some communities divinised monarchs, others placed them in a relationship with divinity, and the other made them representative of a God or of the grace of God.
I hope this will be usefull.
Thanks.
 
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TheMadBaron

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It is. Your teacher was right. The author means "to be held as being divine or a Deity." A better word would be 'Deified'.
 

Latoof

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Jun 20, 2004
So as I understood the word "divinised" is wrong, and that I have to quot it followed with the word [sic], am I right?

I may be slow to understand, sorry:oops:
 
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TheMadBaron

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I think you're right. The word divinised is, at best, very unusual. If you have to quote it, following it with [sic] is a very good idea.
 

Casiopea

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Latoof said:
Hi,

As you have asked me to quote the sentence where the word "Deivinised" appeared. I will give you the paraphrasing of it as I don't have the origin book. The auther says that some communities divinised monarchs, others placed them in a relationship with divinity, and the other made them representative of a God or of the grace of God.
I hope this will be usefull.
Thanks.
divinised, note the -s-, is commonly spelled divinized, with -z. If you look up that spelling, you'll find that dictionaries do in fact list it as a word. As for what it means, please read below:

The explanation of the meaning of the words, "man becomes divinized, is given the grace to become God" (Catechism 398) is actually present in the sentence, though it might not be immediately apparently to those not familiar with the nuances of Catholic theology. By this is not meant that the very nature of man, human nature in general, somehow ceases to be human and becomes the nature of God but rather that it receives a share in the divine life (as indicated by the term "participation") in such a way that it acquires a God-like quality "without ever ceasing to be creature" . This is what the various saints and mystics call the process of "deification" or transformation which occurs through the activity of divine grace secured for us through the saving merits of Christ and principally communicated in and through the sacraments and, as I have tried to show in this article, most fully through the Eucharist.


Read more here: http://www.consecration.com/response.html
 
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