[Grammar] Do you agree with what my teacher thinks about the sentences? Why or Why not

dio2

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context of the sentences: A girl sees her boyfriend talking to other girls.

I don't like you talking to other girls. - The mood is weaker .
I don't like it when you talk to other girls. - The mood is stronger.
I don't want you to talk to other girls. - The mood is stronger.
I don't want you talking to other girls. -The mood is weaker.

I can't tell the differences, though.
 
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bhaisahab

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I don't see any difference in strength.
 

dio2

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I don't see any difference in strength.

Me either.

Maybe because the weaker ones are informal, the stronger ones are formal?

My teacher is a native English speaker, so I think maybe his points are convincing.
 

Tarheel

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The context of the sentences: A girl sees her boyfriend talking to other girls.

I don't like you talking to other girls. - The mood is weaker .
I don't like it when you talk to other girls. - The mood is stronger.
I don't want you to talk to other girls. - The mood is stronger.
I don't want you talking to other girls. -The mood is weaker.

I can't tell the differences, though.

I can't see any difference in strength either.
 
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GoesStation

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Me neither. (You may see and hear me either from many Americans but it's not for formal use.)

Maybe because the weaker ones are informal, the stronger ones are formal?

My teacher is a native English speaker, so I think maybe his points are convincing.
The sentences are in the same register. They're all acceptable for formal or informal use.

This American finds no difference in "strength" among them.
 

dio2

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The sentences are in the same register. They're all acceptable for formal or informal use.

This American finds no difference in "strength" among them.


My teacher is an american, too.

Maybe this is kind of subjective?
 

Tdol

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It is, though your teacher seems to be in the minority here so far.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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I can at least partly agree with your teacher. Some of the sentences are weighted differently.

For one thing, the first two express an opinion. The last two give an order. Big difference, right?

Secondly, the word it gives the second line more punch then the first. Say "I don't like you" and "I don't like it." To my ears, a T at the end of a word has more power than a wimpy vowel.
 

Tarheel

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My teacher is an American, too.

Maybe this is kind of subjective?

Maybe it is to some extent. But capitalization is not.
 

Tdol

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And, of course, in speech we could emphasise words differently to add weight.
 

Rover_KE

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Tarheel was pointing out that in this forum it's mandatory to capitalise (BE spelling) 'American'.
 
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