Does "then surely of all those who had ever walked the earth" mean ...?

Status
Not open for further replies.

NewHopeR

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
China
Does "then surely of all those who had ever walked the earth" mean "then surely all those who had ever walked the earth were Sons of God?"

Context:

The other scandalous thing that the New Testament eyewitnesses said about Him, and that Christians seemed to take as a central tenet of their faith, is that this good man rose from the dead. For a scientific mind, this was difficult stuff. But on the other hand, if Christ really was the Son of God, as He explicitly claimed, then surely of all those who had ever walked the earth, He could suspend the laws of nature if He needed to do so to achieve a more impoortant purpose.
 

Route21

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2010
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Thailand
Although not claiming any authotity in such matters, I'm not sure that your suggestion follows from the quoted passage.

The way I read it would be:

"If anyone, who had ever walked on the face of the earth, had the ability to tweak the laws of nature then surely someone claiming to be the son of God would naturally have potential access to such a God-given ability."

Regards
R21
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
No. Out of all the people who have/had ever been alive, the one who claimed to be the son of God would be the one most likely to be able to change the laws of nature.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top