[General] Don't you be thinking.

arjitsharma

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1.Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you sir.
2. Don't you think that I am going to call you sir.
Do both sentences have the same meaning? Or 1 is used to intensify the sentence?
 

emsr2d2

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I don't really understand what either sentence means. The second one is less grammatically incorrect. It sounds as if it is part of a longer dialogue. Can you give us some more context and explain what you're trying to say?
 

GoesStation

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Punctuation is missing from both sentences. For example, the first could be either Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you, sir or Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you "sir". Its meaning depends on the missing punctuation.
 

GoesStation

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In this sentence, the speaker is discouraging the person s/he's talking to from expecting a phone call: Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you, sir.

In this one the speaker tells the other person not to expect to be called "sir":
Don't you be thinking that I am going to be calling you "sir".

"Don't you be thinking that x" is a casual usage. In more formal speech you'd say "Don't think that x.​"
 

tzfujimino

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Also, Don't you think that I am going to call you, sir? and Don't you think that I am going to call you "sir"? are different in meaning from those two sentences GoesStation explained above.

(The original sentences are imperatives, though.
GS's second explanation (in #5) is likely, I guess.)
 

Tdol

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Adding you to an imperative can make it more emphatic- you'll hear parents saying don't you dare to children. The first sounds like a regional form to me.
 

arjitsharma

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The first sounds like a regional form. I don't understand it. Does the first sentence is used in a particular place?
 

Tdol

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I think it may be used in some areas of the UK, where I am from.
 

GoesStation

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The first sounds like a regional form. I don't understand it. Does the first sentence is used in a particular place?

Black American English uses the form quoted in the first sentence.
 
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