double predicate

Saraj Zhou

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“Websites are proliferating much faster than accessibility can even be made available to them, because it’s all usually done by manual programmers who do one website at a time,” said Hingson, who is blind. [from CNBC]

Does this sentence have two predicate, “are proliferating” and “can be made”?
 

jutfrank

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That sentence has seven predicates, as far as I can see.

Don't confuse predicates with clauses.
 

Saraj Zhou

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I can see there is a “because-clause” and “who-clause”in the above sentence.
But “
Websites are proliferating much faster than accessibility can even be made available to them” should not has more than one predicate right?
 

PaulMatthews

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I can see there is a “because-clause” and “who-clause”in the above sentence.
But “
Websites are proliferating much faster than accessibility can even be made available to them” should not has more than one predicate right?



[Websites are proliferating much faster than [accessibility can even be made available to them], because it’s all usually done by manual programmers who do one website at a time],”

No: the predicates are:

Matrix clause: are proliferating much faster than accessibility can even be made available to them, because it’s all usually done by manual programmers who do one website at a time.

Subordinate clause: can even be made available to them.

Notes:

1. that the outer brackets surround the matrix clause, the inner brackets the embedded subordinate clause.

2. there are further subordinate clauses.
 

TheParser

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“Websites are proliferating much faster than accessibility can even be made available to them, because it’s all usually done by manual programmers who do one website at a time,” said Hingson, who is blind. [from CNBC]

NOT A TEACHER

Saraj Zhou, here are my ideas. If they are demonstratively wrong, the moderators will delete them.

Mona: Websites are proliferating much faster.

Raul: Much faster than what?

Mona: Much faster than the accessibility that can even be made available to them.

After checking my books at home and some results on the Web, I feel that "the accessibility that can even be made available to them" is the subject of that adverbial clause of degree. The predicate is the ellipted "is proliferating fast." That is, native speakers would never say those three words. They are only there for grammatical analysis. (I do think, however, that it would be possible to say "is" after the word "them.")

Here is an easier example of what I am trying to say: "Jim can run faster than Jeff (can run fast)." No native speaker would say those last three words. They might say "Jim can run faster than Jeff can" or even "Jim can run faster than Jeff can run." But they would never repeat the adjective "fast." In parsing, the word "fast" is used only to explain the idea that there is an underlying adjective in that sentence to match the comparative "faster" in the main clause. Source on Google: Daily Grammar Lesson 263 adverb dependent clauses.

My main source was its explanation of adverb clauses of degree in House and Harman's Descriptive English Grammar (1931), page 396.
 
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