dry run

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Moonwalker

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Jan 22, 2008
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This my first post here

Hi I have a question.

I saw a word 'Dry-run' so I looked it up on my Enlgish -Korean dictionary first, and it says it can be a noun, adjective and verb. There is no sample sentences, so I searched it on the web, and an web based Eng-Eng dictionary says its a noun.

I'm confused :shock:

Can anyone reply for me?
 

EnglishRyan

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Jan 23, 2008
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Hey Moonwalker,

In Canada, we use 'dry-run' to refer to testing something. Here are some examples:

Noun:
I just had my car repaired. Let's take it out for a dry-run.

Verb (I guess you could use it like this, though I never have):
They are dry-running for their exam now. Can you call back later?

Adjective (again, I've never used it like this):

The car is dry-runnable, but it will be days until we finish servicing it.

Sorry, that is the best I can do! :D Any other teachers want to chime in?

Ryan
 

EnglishRyan

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By the way, Michael Jackson rules!
 

BobK

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:up: The noun 'dry-run' (used also in British English) comes from the world of engineering - marine engineering, originally, at a guess - you test various facets of a ship while it is still in dry dock. But now the 'dry' part doesn't refer to water at all, and as Ryan says you can use it of cars (or anything being tested).

b
 

Moonwalker

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Jan 22, 2008
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Thank you guys It was really helpful
I'm happy to be here

Yay Michael rules lol
 
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